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    • Join Date: Apr 2008
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    #1

    kick from the backside

    Dear Friends,

    In a radio interview I have heard someone saying:

    "I had to kick him from the backside (verbally)."

    I cannot remember the context, it does not matter, anyway.

    So, can "to kick sy from the backside" mean:

    1. to encourage
    2. to rebuke
    3. other?

    Thanks a lot.

    P.


    • Join Date: Sep 2008
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    #2

    Re: kick from the backside

    If you kick someone in the backside, you are forcing them to action. You would usually use this phrase when you are referring to making someone who is normally lazy or slow-moving do what they are supposed to do.

    "They are so lazy; how did you get them to finish on time?"

    "I had to kick them in the backside, but they got it done."

    Other words you may hear used in the place of backside:
    Butt
    Fanny
    Rear
    Ass

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    • Join Date: Jun 2008
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    #3

    Re: kick from the backside

    Quote Originally Posted by palinkasocsi View Post
    Dear Friends,

    In a radio interview I have heard someone saying:

    "I had to kick him from the backside (verbally)."

    I cannot remember the context, it does not matter, anyway.

    So, can "to kick sy from the backside" mean:

    1. to encourage
    2. to rebuke
    3. other?

    Thanks a lot.

    P.
    I think thedeebo forgot to tell you that "kick him from the backside" is not an idiom, and that you probably heard "kick him in the backside". If that is true, his answer is sufficient.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #4

    Re: kick from the backside

    This idiom is usually "kick up the backside" here.

    "He is so lazy. He wants a good kick up the backside to motivate him!".

  2. BobK's Avatar
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      • English Teacher
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    #5

    Re: kick from the backside

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    This idiom is usually "kick up the backside" here.

    "He is so lazy. He wants a good kick up the backside to motivate him!".
    In Br English the rule seems to be "in" for most target-areas ('Slap in the face', 'smack in the eye'...), but "up" for the backside.

    b


    • Join Date: Sep 2008
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    #6

    Re: kick from the backside

    "I'm going to dominate all up and around your face!"

    -An excited gamer.


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