Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Collocation

  1. #1
    Reemy's Avatar
    Reemy is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Jordan
      • Current Location:
      • Jordan
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    311
    Post Thanks / Like

    Collocation

    Hello,
    Collocation is one subject in the English language that I do care about and wish to have a sufficient list of collocated words. I was writing an email and I needed to collocate a word with "fear" but I couldn't think of one. We can say stings of pain, flames of war, rays of hope, so what can we use with "fear", anyone has any idea?

    Many Thanks,
    Reemy

  2. #2
    Reemy's Avatar
    Reemy is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Jordan
      • Current Location:
      • Jordan
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    311
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Collocation

    Hmmm I've just thought of "shivers", could it be correct? I heard of shivers of horror but not fear.

    What do you think?

    Reemy

  3. #3
    Offroad's Avatar
    Offroad is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Brazilian Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    2,815
    Post Thanks / Like

    Smile Re: Collocation

    Quote Originally Posted by Reemy View Post
    Hello,
    Collocation is one subject in the English language that I do care about and wish to have a sufficient list of collocated words. I was writing an email and I needed to collocate a word with "fear" but I couldn't think of one. We can say stings of pain, flames of war, rays of hope, so what can we use with "fear", anyone has any idea?

    Many Thanks,
    Reemy
    A collocation is a pair or group of words that are often used together. These combinations sound natural to native speakers. Some combinations just sound 'wrong' to natives speakers of English. For example, the adjective fast collocates with cars, but not with a glance.
    In my opinion, one should learn collocations intuitively, by listening to radio and tv programs, talking to people. whether you pick a list (textbook) and start memorizing (even by heart), you will forget all of them eventually. However, whether you insist, I recommend "English collocation in use" by Michael McCarthy and Felicity O'Dell. (Self-study and classroom use). Cambridge.

    Hope this helps

  4. #4
    Reemy's Avatar
    Reemy is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Jordan
      • Current Location:
      • Jordan
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    311
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Collocation

    Thank you.

  5. #5
    vil is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,000
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Collocation

    Hi Reemy,

    There are a few words concerning the matter in question:

    grave fear, mortal fear, strong fear, groundless fear, idle fear, inarticulate fear, lingering fear, sudden fear.

    to fear greatly, to fear very much

    I fear for his safety.

    I fear to think what may happen.

    He fears my getting involves.

    We fear that we will not be able to attend.

    There are fears that no compromise can be worked out.

    He lied for fear of being punished.

    He is in fear of his life.

    He did it out of fear.

    She felt fear their safety.

    to arouse, inspire, instill kindle fear

    to express, feel, show fear

    to confim one’s fer

    to allay, dispel, overcome fear

    Regards,

    V.
    Last edited by vil; 03-Nov-2008 at 18:35.

  6. #6
    Reemy's Avatar
    Reemy is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Jordan
      • Current Location:
      • Jordan
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    311
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Collocation

    Thanks so much Vil for your feedback.
    What I needed indeed is a word works as a quantifier "figuratively" for fear and it collocates with it, for example we say waves of mercy or pangs of guilt, so I just needed a word works as well for "fear" and as I said earlier I guess shivers of fear would be suitable.

    Reemy

  7. #7
    vil is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,000
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Collocation

    Hi Reemy,

    There is a further word, namely “shudder”, similar to your “shiver” as well as a few exemplary sentences:

    shiver (v) = a shaking, quivering, or trembling, as from fear or cold

    shiver (n) = an instance of shivering or trembling

    shudder (n) = a convulsive shiver, as from fear or revulsion; a tremor.

    She shivered at the thought of getting up.

    The empire shivers in fear.

    Miss Snark shivers with fear.

    Fear causes the 'shivers down the spine'.

    A shiver of fear ran through her, to be replaced by a strange tingling of masochistic pleasure.

    Soon the woman felt a shiver of fear and fell on her knees and cried, "Save me from my sin!”

    Melanie felt a shudder of dread (fear) as she went by every door, in case it opened and something, some clockwork horror rolling hugely on small wheels, some terrifying joke or hideous novelty, emerged to put her courage to the test.

    And even now, after Dr Neil's healing influence, daily exerted, for although he could not make direct love to her he was able to let her know in a thousand different ways how much he loved her, and how precious she was to him, she still felt the odd shudder of shame and fear.

    Regards,

    V.

Similar Threads

  1. collocation
    By Anonymous in forum UsingEnglish.com Content
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 20-Jun-2006, 00:20
  2. collocation
    By semsem1001 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 18-Dec-2005, 09:02
  3. Collocation 'rich woods'
    By Veronikap in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 21-Nov-2005, 13:51
  4. collocation
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 16-Feb-2005, 08:38

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •