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  1. #1
    Offroad's Avatar
    Offroad is offline Key Member
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    Smile The languages of the UK

    Hi dear friends and teachers,

    I heard there are "dialects" of English like Scots, and there are also Celtic languages such as Welsh, Irish, Gaelic and Cornish. I also heard they are spoken in some countries in the South America. So, please, could you show us how different they are from English spoken in London or even in the United States?

    Thanks in advance!
    Last edited by Offroad; 08-Nov-2008 at 16:45.

  2. #2
    Tdol is online now Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: The languages of the UK

    Here are some sites that will give you some examples of various languages, both living and dead, from the British Isles. Welsh, Irish, Cornish, etc, are very different; they aren't just dialects.
    The British Isles - ESL Web Directory - UsingEnglish.com

  3. #3
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    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: The languages of the UK

    ...and don't make the mistake of thinking that Scots is the only native language (other than English) spoken in Scotland. There are three main 'threads' - one like standard English, one related to the Northumbrian dialect (see Wir Ain Leid - An introduction to Modern Scots), and a Celtic language only very remotely related to English (they had a common ancestor thousands of years ago). This Celtic language is known as 'Scottishs Gaelic', and is still spoken in the north and west - especially in the Outer Hebrides; see Scottish Gaelic - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. I once edited a book about life on Harris, and when I suggested a change the author said 'It's your language. (Scots "Gaelic" has an //, whereas Irish Gaelic has an /eı/ - in English, that is!) See Irish language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. There is also a mish-mash of English, (Scots?), and Gaelic: Shelta - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    b

  4. #4
    Offroad's Avatar
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    Smile Re: The languages of the UK

    Many thanks Bob, it helped out a lot!

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