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Thread: Linking verbs

  1. #1
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    Default Linking verbs

    Only linking verbs allow an adjective to occur immediately after the verb.
    When can I find a complete list of linking verbs?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Linking verbs

    There are two kinds of linking verbs: those that express a state and those that express a result.

    Express a state
    am, is, are, was, were, be, being, been (any any combination that ends with be or been: has been, have been, had been, will be, shall be, may be, would have been, should have been, would be).
    Express a result: These are called "resultative"
    act, appear, be, feel, lie, look, remain, seem, smell, sound, stay, taste, become, get, grow, fall, prove, run, turn

    A resultative verb can function as either a linking verb or an action verb. Here's a test you can use to help you decide: Replace the resultative verb with am, is, are, was, etc. For example, let's try the verbs 'grow' and 'look':

    The man grows flowers.
    => The man is flowers. (Not OK)
    ('grows' is not a linking verb here. It's an action verb)

    The man grows tired.
    => The man is tired. (OK)
    ('grows' is a linking verb here.)

    She is looking at the flowers.
    => She is at the flowers. (Not OK)
    ('is looking' is not a linking verb here. It's an action verb)

    She is looking good.
    => She is good (i.e., looking). (OK)
    ('is looking' functions as a linking verb here.)
    Here's a test to help you decide whether the word that come after the linking verb is a noun or an adjective: Replace the linking verb with the verb seem. Only adjectives fit grammatically in the position:

    He is a doctor.
    => He seems a doctor. (Not OK)
    ('a doctor' is not an adjective)

    He is happy.
    => He seems happy. (OK)
    ('happy' is an adjective)

  3. #3
    notmyname216 is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Linking verbs

    Is the verb "play" also a linking verb?

    Example: He plays rough.

  4. #4
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: Linking verbs

    No, 'rough' describes the way he plays, not the way he is; he could be a true gentleman the rest of the time.

  5. #5
    notmyname216 is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Linking verbs

    Look at the sentence below:

    Example: He plays rough.

    "rough" is a adjective that immediately follows the verb. I thought that ONLY linking verbs allowed that sentence structure.

    So other verbs, other than linking verbs, allow a adjective to occur immediately following the verb? If so which ones?

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    Default Re: Linking verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by notmyname216
    Look at the sentence below:

    Example: He plays rough.

    "rough" is a adjective that immediately follows the verb. I thought that ONLY linking verbs allowed that sentence structure.

    So other verbs, other than linking verbs, allow a adjective to occur immediately following the verb? If so which ones?
    tdol is correct. 'rough' is an adverb in that context. 'rough' describes how he plays, not what kind of person he is. Here are two test that might help you to determine if the word is an adjective or an adverb:

    Adjective Test: Ask the question, What kind of?

    EX: He is a rough football player.
    Q: What kind of football player is he?
    A: He is a rough one. (Adjective)

    Adverb Test: Ask one of the questions, How, When, Where, Why?

    EX: He plays rough.
    Q: How does he play?
    A: He plays rough. (Adverb)

  7. #7
    kiranlegend is offline Member
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    Default Re: Linking verbs

    He plays good.

    So, good is adverb in this context?:O (should i keep the article, an, beside adverb here?)

    Ts.

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