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  1. #1
    munchun2004 Guest

    Default Adjective clauses

    When it comes to complex sentence with adjective clause, I always lost. I don’t know if I should keep the sentence in present or past tense. For examples,
    a) Yesterday he went to the haunted house that we all scare of to seek for his missing ring.
    As the conversation goes, we still scare of the house, so should we keep the sentence in present tense?

    b) If I knew it was the last time I saw you draw picture of a man first sees god, I would have taken a picture out of your painting.
    I think the title of the drawing should be unchanged, that’s why present tense is upheld.

    c) Grandpa: Stan, come over here. You always told me you didn't know how it feels/felt like being old and on wheel. Now I found way to show you how it feels like to be me.
    For this sentence, I really have no idea I should use ‘feels’ or ‘felt’, they both seem correct to me and I don’t know which one to choose.

    d) Where did you learn a feat like that? I mean, where did you learn how to disable your enemy like that before he takes his move? It was amazing.
    Can present tense be used? I think this sentence is quite fluent to speak of.

    e) Look, my second week in CSI you told me when a cheating spouse is murdered, there's always two suspects at the top of the list, the lover and the betrayed.
    I heard this dialog on CSI TV show; I repeatedly heard it four times to confirm what I heard. The investigator did say the above dialog which I consider ungrammatical. Is this dialog correct and why?

    f) I asked the mechanic one question about how that machine works and to my surprise that mechanic couldn't answer my question.
    Should we use ‘works’ or ‘worked’? I think ‘worked’ is appropriate but I am confused.

    g) I wish I could have a mentor to show me what is the purpose of life when I was a child.
    I find that when an adjective clause is a title of discussion or simply looks like a title, present tense can always be used. Just like the example above. Could it be true?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Adjective clauses

    a) Yesterday, he went to the haunted house --the one that we are all afraid of--to look for his missing ring.

    'that we are all afraid of' tells us that we are still afraid of the haunted house.
    'that we were all afraid of' tells us that we are no longer afraid of the haunted house.

    b) If I knew that was going to be the last time that I'd see you draw picture of a man who sees god for the first time, I would have taken a picture out of your painting.

    The man in the painter sees God for the first time, so use 'sees'.

    c) You have always told me (that) you don't know what it feels like to be old and on wheels. Now I found way to show you what it feels like to be me.

    You don't know how it feels or You don't know what is feels like. (general fact)

    d) Where did you learn a feat like that? I mean, where did you learn how to disable your enemy like that before he takes his move? It was amazing.

    Past
    It was amazing: What you did was amazing.
    Present
    It is amazing: What you can do is amazing.

    e) Look, (during) my second week in/at CSI you told me (that) when a cheating spouse is murdered there's always two suspects at the top of the list: the lover and the betrayed.

    It's fine. I added in the omitted words, and changed the punctuation. (Hey, by the way, I saw that episode. It was amazing!)

    f) I asked the mechanic one question about how that machine works and to my surprise that mechanic couldn't answer my question.

    General fact: How the machine works.

    g) When I was a child, I wish I had a mentor who could show me the purpose of life.

  3. #3
    munchun2004 Guest

    Default Re: Adjective clauses

    Thanks for all the answer, Cassiopeia. However, I gues there is still one answer not clear to me. You said that

    c) You have always told me (that) you don't know what it feels like to be old and on wheels. Now I found way to show you what it feels like to be me.

    is correct, but I wonder if

    ci) You always told me (that) you didn't know what it feels like to be old and on wheels. Now I found way to show you what it feels like to be me.

    is correct? I don't know if I should change 'what it feels' to past tense 'what it felt' because the initial verbs are in past tense like 'told' and 'didn't'. Could it be that the phrase 'what it feels to be old and on wheels' has the same General Fact attribute like the clause you told me 'how the machine works'?

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