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  1. #1
    jctgf is offline Key Member
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    Default rise to the moment

    And while the road ahead will be long, and the work will be hard, I know that we can steer ourselves out of this crisis, because here in America we always rise to the moment, no matter how hard.

    Hi,
    I'd like to know if the underlined expression could be rephrased as "keep up to the challenge of the moment".
    Also, I wonder if I can use this expression casually, like in "I don't know if I can rise to this job/task/challenge.".
    Thanks.

  2. #2
    MrPedantic is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: rise to the moment

    Hello JC,

    You could paraphrase it as "to adjust to the increased demands of the task in hand".

    In casual use, or for a task that was not particularly onerous, it might sound a little sarcastic.

    Best wishes,

    MrP

    Not a professional ESL teacher.

  3. #3
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    Talking Re: rise to the moment

    The expression, if not cliche, is usually 'rise to the occasion'.
    "I don't know if I can rise to this job/task/challenge.".
    You could say that with ease in the UK, but never...NEVER say this is America.
    There, everything is at least put in a positive light; there's never any diffidence: it's always a 'we're gonna kick ass!' attitude.

    Also, whatever activity you do pursue, perhaps achieving some great scientific breakthrough, then it was not work, or even, actually, out of deep intellectual interest: it was because looking for/discovering life on another planet "seemed a fun thing to do."
    Last edited by David L.; 16-Nov-2008 at 14:40.

  4. #4
    jctgf is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: rise to the moment

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    There, everything is at least put in a positive light; there's never any diffidence: it's always a 'we're gonna kick ass!' attitude.
    Hi David,
    I am not sure I understand what you mean. Could you please explain this part of your reply?
    Thanks.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: rise to the moment

    Americans teem with self-confidence, so that expressing doubt about one's ability is an alien notion - at least, it is not expressed. It would never be, "Let's give it a try!" A positive outcome is always professed, nay, trumpeted.

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