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  1. #1
    blueladysw's Avatar
    blueladysw is offline Newbie
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    Question questions in phonetics and phonology

    hi, i want to ask what's the difference between lenis and fortis?and why do we use them instead of voiceless and voiced terms respectively
    why do we call /w,r,j/ sounds as glides?and also approximants or semi vowels
    why /p,t,k/ are called vioceless and strong what's voiceless and strong about or voiced and weak
    why/h/ is called voiceless vowel phonetically,and /h/ consonant phonologocally
    is the sound at the end of sing a phoneme
    are the initial sounds in chin and gem are one phoneme
    difference between phonemic transcription and phonetic transcription
    when is a sound devoiced why
    is the glottal stop a phoneme
    how many phonemes are there in the triphthongs
    difference between dialect and accent
    why /w,j,r/ sound like vowels but function as consonants
    meanings of phonetics and phonologyanswer me soon

  2. #2
    Soup's Avatar
    Soup is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: questions in phonetics and phonology

    1. What's the difference between lenis and fortis?
    2. Why do we use them instead of voiceless and voiced terms respectively?
    Click Fortis and lenis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    3. Why do we call /w,r,j/ sounds as glides?
    The tongue glides.

    4. Why approximants?
    They approximate the sound.

    5. Why semi-vowel?
    You can sing/hold them.

    6. Why are /p,t,k/ called vioceless and strong?
    Voiceless: the vocal folds don't vibrate.
    Strong: air pressure builds and is then released.

    7. What's voiced and weak?
    Voiced: the vocal folds vibrate.
    Weak: air pressure doesn't build.

    8. Why is /h/ called voiceless vowel phonetically, and /h/ consonant phonologocally?
    Phonetically: because its manner of articulation involves air through an open glottis, like a vowel.
    Phonologically: it doesn't contrast with vowels; that it, it's never found in a vocalic position.

    9. Is the sound at the end of sing a phoneme?
    Yes. It's a sound of English. It's called a velar-nasal.

    10. Are the initial sounds in chin and gem one phoneme.
    No. Evidence: chin vs gin; they contrast. That is, change the first sound in chin and you get a new word.


    11. What is the difference between phonemic transcription and phonetic transcription?
    Phonetic = speech sound; phonemic = the patterns of those sounds; where they can and cannot occur.

    12. When is a sound devoiced?
    When it sits between two voiceless sounds or sometimes at the end of a word.

    13. Is the glottal stop a phoneme?
    It can be, yes.

    14. How many phonemes are there in the triphthongs?
    Usually two. There are two noticeable changes in QUALITY during a syllable.

    15. What's the difference between dialect and accent?
    Example: In Shanghai, China, people speak the local dialect with various accents; e.g., Shanghainese with a French accent; Shanghainese with a Japanese accent.

    16. Why are /w,j,r/ sound like vowels but function as consonants.
    They sit in consonant positions.

    17. What are the meanings of phonetics and phonology?
    Phonetics vs. Phonology
    Last edited by Soup; 24-Nov-2008 at 14:41.

  3. #3
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: questions in phonetics and phonology

    Wow

    A couple of additions on the subject of 8/9 and 13:

    8/9 It's useful to learn and use phonemic script. Go to Phonemic symbols | Teaching English | British Council | BBC - this will make it easy to tell what the phonemes are in "chin/gin", "sing" and so on. Download this Phonemic chart | Teaching English | British Council | BBC

    '13. Is the glottal stop a phoneme?
    It can be, yes.'

    Can be; in some languages it is, and in some dialects of English it is. It's not a phoneme of standard English, and it's useful in an advanced student's passive repertoire - speech sounds that s/he can recognize.

    b

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