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  1. #1
    Will17 is offline Senior Member
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    Wink Past simple present perfect

    Hello,

    I need some help:


    If at the end of the lesson I say to my classmate:

    "We don't need to write anything on the board because you've written everything along the lesson on your notebook" Is it correct?

    would it be better to say "because you wrote everything along the lesson..."?

    or is it the same in that case?


    Thanks a lot

  2. #2
    philadelphia's Avatar
    philadelphia is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Past simple present perfect

    you've written everything along the lesson on your notebook" Is it correct? means all you have written so far. There is no rupture.

    you wrote everything along the lesson would mean all you wrote during the class. There is a sort of rupture.

    Both are correct but the first one sounds better to me

    Not a teacher at all, anyway

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Past simple present perfect

    "We don't need to write anything on the board because you've written everything along the lesson on your notebook"

    "We don't need to write anything on the board because you've written everything about the lesson in your notebook"

    Grammatically, this is more correct.
    Logically, the sentence does not make sense. It makes more sense if the sentence is:

    "We don't need to write anything that's on the board because you've written everything about the lesson in your notebook."

    Now it means: the lecturer gave a lesson, and wrote notes/headings/an outline of the lesson the board; and the other students don't need to write down what's on the board, because another student - the 'you', of 'you've' -
    has already copied this down in his notebook ( and they can, presumably, get a copy of this later.).
    Why would the sequence be:
    (a) the lecturer writes on the board
    then
    (b) a student writes this in his notebook
    then
    (c) the other students ("we") copy what's in his notebook and then...then...write it again on the board.
    Last edited by David L.; 05-Nov-2008 at 17:40.

  4. #4
    Will17 is offline Senior Member
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    Wink Re: Past simple present perfect

    Thanks David.

    My example wasn't clear indeed.

    In fact, during our lessons, the teacher never writes anything on the board.

    He does it only at the end. He writes only the most important things, he does /make (?) a kind of short summary.

    In that case, our teacher saw us taking notes all along the lesson, so at the end of the lesson, he said "we don't need to write anything on the board because you have written everything in your notebooks along the lesson".

    And I wondered if, in that we could also use the past simple and say: "because you wrote everything along the lesson".

    What do you think?

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    Default Re: Past simple present perfect

    In that case, our teacher saw us taking notes during the lesson, so at the end of the lesson, he said, "You don't need to write anything (that's) on the board because you have written everything in your notebooks during the lesson".

    And I wondered if, in that we could also use the past simple and say: "because you wrote everything during the lesson".

    What do you think?


    It's possible...but for the teacher to use the Past Simple, his perspective would be that the lesson is over. For example, the summary is on the board, and he starts to leave the classroom, and notices that the students aren't leaving, but copying down what's on the blackboard. Then...then I can imagine his using the Past Simple.
    But in your explanation, it sounds like he has just written the summary and then says they don't need to copy it because - and he is looking back over the whole lesson and how he had noticed them all taking notes - 'you have written everything in your books already'. So, the Present Perfect would be more appropriate.

  6. #6
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    Raymott is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: Past simple present perfect

    Quote Originally Posted by Will17 View Post
    Thanks David.

    My example wasn't clear indeed.
    Yes, it was clear enough. But David has misunderstood you. Otherwise, I'm not sure why he'd insist on changing your teacher's words to make there be something on the board when there isn't.


    In any case, the present perfect is still the correct answer.

  7. #7
    Tulkoju is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: Past simple present perfect

    An American English perspective:
    I would use either past perfect or the simple present depending on the exact circumstances. Indeed the lesson is over or coming to an end, but maybe there are a few minutes left for questions, etc. And as Raymott put it your explanation was clear, but David insisted on the writing already being on the board. The point is that he is not writing anything down as he usually would.

    I would see it this way.

    1. The teacher teaches the lesson. All the while the student take notes.

    2. The lesson is coming to an end, and instead of writing the key words or phrases on the board as s/he normally does, the teacher explains, before saying goodbye:

    "We don't need to write anything on the board because you (plural as in vous in French) wrote everything in your notebook during the lesson."

    or:

    2b: The lesson is coming to an end (but not yet over), and instead of using the last ten minutes to write key words on the board, he leaves this time open to questions and says:

    "We don't need to write anything on the board because you've written everything in your notebook during the lesson."

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Past simple present perfect

    In that case, our teacher saw us taking notes during the lesson, so at the end of the lesson, he said, "You don't need to write anything (that's) on the board because you have written everything in your notebooks during the lesson".


    That was the information I drew on from the second post. I ain't insisting on nuff'n.

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