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  1. #1
    sitifan is offline Senior Member
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    Default Prof. or professor

    1. Professor John Brown
    2. Prof. John Brown
    3. Professor Brown
    4. Prof. Brown
    Which of the above expressions is not acceptable?

  2. #2
    jlinger is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Prof. or professor

    Number 4 is not acceptable.

    Do you know why?

  3. #3
    sitifan is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Prof. or professor

    I don't know why. Please tell me. Thank you very much for your help.

  4. #4
    tedtmc is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: Prof. or professor

    Prof. is an abbreviation, a slang word which is meant to be informal.

    'Prof. Brown' sounds odd, prof being informal and Brown(surname) being formal.

  5. #5
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Default Re: Prof. or professor

    The correctness of "Prof. Brown" rather depends on the context of use. If the use is a formal letter or communication, the full name would be required. However, if it is a mention within a text, the shorter form is acceptable:

    The following were present at the meeting: Prof. Brown, Sen.Lec. Jones, Assoc. Prof. Robinson.

  6. #6
    sitifan is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Prof. or professor

    Prof. abbr. (in writing) Professor: Prof. Mike Harrison
    Possible entries for prof

  7. #7
    jlinger is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Prof. or professor

    The correct answer is that you do not use abbreviated titles without first name or initial: Prof. A. Jones but Professor Jones.

    The only exceptions: Mr., Mrs., Ms., Dr., Jr. and Sr.

  8. #8
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Default Re: Prof. or professor

    There is no rule that says informally the full name is required. If the person is referred to in a text, it is acceptable to use only the surname:

    Prof. Stevens sees the creation of the BP Chair as an important step in the Centre
    Prof. Button, Loughborough University, calculates that cars consume (high) 18% of Gross Domestic Product.
    Prof. Lounsbury's entertaining book appeals...

  9. #9
    jlinger is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Prof. or professor

    Indeed there IS such a rule and I just gave it to you. All three of your examples are incorrect.

    I don't like rules, either, but please don't tell me there is none when there is. And don't go hiding behind the British English excuse, either, please. It's a British rule. Americans don't make rules. They break them.

  10. #10
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: Prof. or professor

    I'm not too sure what you mean by hiding behind the BrE excuse, but the part about Americans strikes me as a bit uncalled for.

    By act of Congress the Public Printer of the U.S. Government Printing Office (GPO) is authorized to determine the form and style of Government printing. The Style Manual is the product of many years of public printing experience, and its rules are based on principles of good usage and custom in the printing trade.
    USGPO Style Manual: About

    Could we calm things down a bit here. please?

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