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  1. #1
    Unregistered Guest

    Default qustion on idiomatic expression

    i want to no the idiomayi expression with thier meaning,
    the examples are like,
    1, out of touch with; no longer familiar with .
    2, it is beyond me; it is dificult for me to understand.
    this are two out of the examples which i want to know on the idiomatic expression.

  2. #2
    Natalie27 Guest

    Default Re: qustion on idiomatic expression

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered
    i want to no the idiomayi expression with thier meaning,
    the examples are like,
    1, out of touch with; no longer familiar with .
    2, it is beyond me; it is dificult for me to understand.
    this are two out of the examples which i want to know on the idiomatic expression.
    to be out of touch can mean two things:
    people are not in touch with each other (= they don't communicate with each other any more).
    ex.

    My long lost relatives have been out of touch with me for twenty six years!

    It can also mean that you are far off on a particular subject or lacking information.

    The governor's speech was out of touch on the most important issues for our community.

    beyond me means too much for me to inderstand, there is no way I can understand something, too much for my knowledge or experience.

    I tried to learn calligraphy in school but it was way beyond me. = it was too difficult for me to learn that.


  3. #3
    Nahualli Guest

    Default Re: qustion on idiomatic expression

    Quote Originally Posted by Natalie27
    to be out of touch can mean two things:
    people are not in touch with each other (= they don't communicate with each other any more).
    ex.

    My long lost relatives have been out of touch with me for twenty six years!

    It can also mean that you are far off on a particular subject or lacking information.

    The governor's speech was out of touch on the most important issues for our community.

    beyond me means too much for me to inderstand, there is no way I can understand something, too much for my knowledge or experience.

    I tried to learn calligraphy in school but it was way beyond me. = it was too difficult for me to learn that.

    I think he/she was asking for more expressions like the ones he posted, don't think he was looking for the meaning of his, they're pretty right on.

    At any rate, there's a whole forum dedicated to this topic. I think it's too much for anyone to post here in a reply given the number of expressions like this there are in English.

    -Nah-

  4. #4
    Natalie27 Guest

    Default Re: qustion on idiomatic expression

    Quote Originally Posted by Nahualli
    I think he/she was asking for more expressions like the ones he posted, don't think he was looking for the meaning of his, they're pretty right on.

    At any rate, there's a whole forum dedicated to this topic. I think it's too much for anyone to post here in a reply given the number of expressions like this there are in English.

    -Nah-
    I appreciate your genuine concern for the way this board is running. I generally feel free to answer questions that I choose at my own discretion. As long as questions remain posted without being moved or removed by the administrator, I feel they are valid, important and waiting for a response. If for whatever reason you feel otherwise, you can address that issue with Red5/the moderators or you can advise the person yourself to post his/her questions on a different forum.
    As for addressing me in the future in regards to the way the forum should or shouldn't be run or whether you feel my reply was useless altogether, please contact the administrator or our moderators, instead.

    Thank you.

  5. #5
    Nahualli Guest

    Default Re: qustion on idiomatic expression

    Quote Originally Posted by Natalie27
    I appreciate your genuine concern for the way this board is running. I generally feel free to answer questions that I choose at my own discretion. As long as questions remain posted without being moved or removed by the administrator, I feel they are valid, important and waiting for a response. If for whatever reason you feel otherwise, you can address that issue with Red5/the moderators or you can advise the person yourself to post his/her questions on a different forum.
    As for addressing me in the future in regards to the way the forum should or shouldn't be run or whether you feel my reply was useless altogether, please contact the administrator or our moderators, instead.

    Thank you.
    Holy cow, talk about defensive... I wasn't addressing you alone in this thread and I certainly wasn't attacking you, just clarifying. I was adressing the poster, because he/she may not have noticed that there's a whole forum dedicated to idiomatic expressions and the finer nuances of the English language. I'm certainly not an old timer here but even I've noticed that most people post their message here and don't always take the time to browse, something which in this case may have yielded excellent results.

    As for what I was replying to you, I was simply pointing out that the original query was not asking for an actual definition of the idiomatic expressions, as they provided those themselves. They were asking about other expressions *like* the ones posted, to which I replied that there's a whole forum about this, for reference.

    In the future I'll be sure to enumerate my posts more succinctly, as well as provide bullet points, direct quotes and bold text to make sure no part of any message I post is ever misinterpreted. Furthermore I will litter my posts with flowers, hearts and happy faces so that no one misunderstands my tone is not a belligerent one.

    -Nah-

  6. #6
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: qustion on idiomatic expression

    Many people post things in the wrong areas, sadly. They just head straight for things like Ask a Teacher regardless. Once they get to know things posts get more targetted.

    We have had a spot of flaming recently, so & flowers are always appreciated.


  7. #7
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    Default Re: qustion on idiomatic expression

    Yeah, that's crazy. People must be p*ssed about Bush being re-elected or something.
    I guess it's everyone's responsibility to make sure our posts cannot be mis-interpreted, as the situation is bound to escalate afterwards (both parties think they've been unfairly attacked).

    FRC

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