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Thread: pronunciation

  1. #1
    dawoud is offline Newbie
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    Default pronunciation

    thank you first to give us the opportunity to ask questions to which we are waitnig for answers...my question is asked by many pupils...about the rules for stress in syllables...monosyllabic...three syllable words and so on.
    if posible ..something related to intonation rules ...please with examples...puipils here want to grasp the rules we give them but they ask many questions...to the extent that we tell them you re not native speakers...just take it as it is...and that s not good for their learning..we just promise them to give them other examples.
    thank you in advance.

  2. #2
    oregeezer is offline Member
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    Default Re: pronunciation

    My Virus blocker won't let me open your file. I contains a Trojan Horse virus.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: pronunciation

    (Not an English teacher)

    Dawoud,

    Unfortunately, English lacks an invariable system of rules to govern stress on syllables in words, and since the language also lacks accent marks, learners are left on their own. However, there is a basic set of rules governing stress on syllables, although there are exceptions to them. If you look up "stress in English words" on the web, you can find four excellent sites on this topic in the first four entries.

    Not everyone (regionally or individually) stresses syllables the same way (some say INsurance and others say inSURance, but these differences are relatively few. Furthermore, syllables in some words may be stressed in two different ways, depending on what part of speech they represent: PREsent (noun, adjective) and preSENT (verb).

    English also depends very heavily on stress on entire words to give a particular meaning to a sentence. One of the web sites mentioned above gives a good example of this.

    G.F. (My virus blocker didn't catch the trojan horse; hope I'll be all right)
    Last edited by Greg Forbes; 23-Nov-2008 at 04:46.

  4. #4
    pyoung is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: pronunciation

    Dear Dawoud:

    You may find this site helpful:

    http://www.soundsofenglish.org/

    All best wishes,

    Petra

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