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  1. #1
    vil is offline VIP Member
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    Default I am not being quite frank with you. / I am not frank with you.

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to explain to me the difference between the meanings of the following two sentences?

    1. He leaned forward confidentially, and continued in an intimate half-boyish tone: “I am not being quite frank with you. Andy I feel I must be. It’s my wife. My wife won’t let me go.”

    2. He leaned forward confidentially, and continued in an intimate half-boyish tone: “I am not frank with you. Andy I feel I must be. It’s my wife. My wife won’t let me go.”

    In my opinion there is only an emotional color in the first sentence but the its primary meaning is the same.

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.

  2. #2
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    Raymott is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: I am not being quite frank with you. / I am not frank with you.

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to explain to me the difference between the meanings of the following two sentences?

    1. He leaned forward confidentially, and continued in an intimate half-boyish tone: “I am not being quite frank with you. Andy I feel I must be. It’s my wife. My wife won’t let me go.”

    2. He leaned forward confidentially, and continued in an intimate half-boyish tone: “I am not frank with you. Andy I feel I must be. It’s my wife. My wife won’t let me go.”

    In my opinion there is only an emotional color in the first sentence but the its primary meaning is the same.

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    The second version is not used.
    You can use it in the present perfect: "I haven't been entirely frank with you" or past progressive "I wasn't being as frank as I could have been with you".
    You'd rarely hear "I wasn't frank with you", and I've never heard "I'm not frank with you". If you think about it you'll understand why.

  3. #3
    vil is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: I am not being quite frank with you. / I am not frank with you.

    Hi Raymott,

    Thank you for your popular persuation.

    You made it clear to me “what nonsense is the wording I am Frank Sinatra”.

    I was misled from the following wording "tell me what you think--and you may just as well be frank" as well as from the following my layman reasoning:

    I am not being frank.. = there is a connotation about my not straightfotward behaviour towards you just at this instant.

    I am not frank with you = there is a connotation about “as a rule”, “in general”, “usually”

    Thank you again for your empathy.

    Regards,

    V.

  4. #4
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Default Re: I am not being quite frank with you. / I am not frank with you.

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    I am not frank with you = there is a connotation about “as a rule”, “in general”, “usually”

    V.
    Exactly! That is the reason people don't say that. Because at this point, the person IS being frank, so a change is occurring. The present (habitual) tense in not appropriate because it implies ongoing unfrankness.
    Since this is a point of change, the person will say "(Up until now), I have not been frank with you" or "I wasn't being frank with you. But that changes now"

    You can use the present tense by saying "I'm not always frank with you, but I want to tell you something important". This leaves open the possibility of not being frank continuing to be a habitual action. But you need an explicit adverb rather than relying on a connotation.

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