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Thread: Adjectives

  1. #11
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    Default Re: Adjectives

    Thanks.

    I would talk about computer viruses.
    What do you mean by this? Why is 'computer viruses' italic?

  2. #12
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    Default Re: Adjectives

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    Thanks.

    What do you mean by this? Why is 'computer viruses' italic?
    Change the noun+preposition phrase to an adjecive+noun phrase, like this,

    viruses in computers => computer viruses

  3. #13
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    Default Re: Adjectives

    3, 4 and 5 are awkward IMO. They could work, but they're more likely to be said from someone who doesn't know much about the topic. I would talk about computer viruses.
    Thanks, this was very helpful.

  4. #14
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    Default Re: Adjectives


    5. You can buy stuff at stock price. => Adjective

    Isn't 'price' countable? How come it isn't 'at (a) stock price.'? How do you know if you don't need the 'a' there?

  5. #15
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    Default Re: Adjectives

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    Isn't 'price' countable? How come it isn't 'at (a) stock price.'? How do you know if you don't need the 'a' there?
    at the stock price (a specific price)
    at a stock price (more than one price; there are many stock prices)
    at stock price (whatever the general price is that day/week/month for the store)

  6. #16
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    Default Re: Adjectives

    Thanks.
    at the stock price (a specific price)
    I dont get it. What do you mean by 'specific price'?
    1. You can buy this product at the stock price. (Do you mean this is a 'specific stock price'?
    2. You can buy this product at a stock price. (Doesn't this mean the same thing as #1?)
    3. You can buy this product at stock price. (What does this mean? I still don't really get the difference between this one and the other ones. Also, how come this sentence is correct without using the determiner?)

    at a stock price (more than one price; there are many stock prices)
    at stock price (whatever the general price is that day/week/month for the store)
    I still don't really get the difference in meaning between these two. Can you explain it again? Thanks.

    What do these mean?
    4. I still don't really get the difference between this one and the other ones.
    5. I still don't really get the difference in meaning between this one and the other ones.

    6. You can get this at stock price. (correct)
    7. You can get this at (a) store. (Incorrect. How come I need to use 'a' here? #6 is correct, why isn't this one correct as well?)

    What do these mean?
    8. You can get this at discounted price. (Is this correct? If not, why?)
    9. You can get this at the discount price.
    10. You can get this at a discounted price.

    What do these mean?
    11.Sony had become Canada's largest electronics retailer. (Correct? Why is 'electronics' not 'electronic'? Isn't 'electronics' a noun and 'electronic' is an adjective?)
    12. Sony had become Canada's largest electronic retailer.

    If #11 is right, is this correct as well? What do these mean?
    13. Sony had become Canada's largest appliance retailer.
    13. Sony had become Canada's largest appliances retailer. (If this is incorrect, why?)
    Last edited by jack; 17-Nov-2004 at 10:07.

  7. #17
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    Default Re: Adjectives

    What do these mean?

    1. She is a commission salesperson.
    2. She is a commissioned salesperson.

    3. She is commissioned.
    4. She is commission.

    5. I have a commission-hungry salesperson.
    6. I have a commissioned-hungry salesperson. (Why is this wrong? Is it because you can't have two adjectives?)

    7. I have a ten-feet cord. ('feet' is wrong right? It should be 'foot'? Because adjectives don't take -ed- or -s?)

    8. She is a commission-killer.
    9. She is a commissioned-killer.

    10. I get commission. (Profit from selling?)
    11. I get commissioned. (Does this mean that I was a salesperson with a hourly pay and now I am commissioned?)
    Last edited by jack; 23-Nov-2004 at 06:04.

  8. #18
    TheMadBaron Guest

    Default Re: Adjectives

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    What do these mean?

    1. She is a commission salesperson.
    Did you make this up? It suggests that she sells things on commission, which means that she takes a percentage of the proceeds from each sale she makes (as opposed to a set wage or salary). I think it sounds very unusual, however.

    I would say "She is a salesperson. She's on (a) commission."

    2. She is a commissioned salesperson.
    This sounds very unusual.

    "Commissioned" is used with regard to (a) an artist or composer employed to perform a specific task for an agreed fee, or (b) a member of the armed forces.

    (a) You might commission an artist to paint a picture, or a composer to write a piece of music. If somebody is commissioned to do a job, they are not a permanent employee.

    "She's the artist who was commissioned to paint the portrait of the King."

    "He's a composer. He was commissioned to write a symphony for the Queen's birthday."

    (b) A 'commissioned officer' holds his rank by virtue of a commision from the government.

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    3. She is commissioned.
    It sounds unusual. What job does she do?
    If she is an artist, it means the same as #2(a), but it's more common to say "she has been commisioned (to paint a picture)."
    If she's a military officer, it means the same as #2(b), but it's more common to say "she is a commissioned officer".

    4. She is commission.
    That doesn't mean anything at all.

    5. I have a commission-hungry salesperson.
    The salesperson is hungry for sales, not food. She is very keen to sell a lot of your products and make plenty of money from the proceeds.

    6. I have a commissioned-hungry salesperson. (Why is this wrong? Is it because you can't have two adjectives?)
    You can have two adjectives, but you should seperate them with a comma, not a hyphen.

    "I have a fat, green frog"

    Yours would be a very strange example, though....

    "I have a commissioned, hungry salesperson."

    It's strange because her being 'commissioned' and her being 'hungry' are unrelated.

    "I have a tired, hungry salesperson" sounds more reasonable. She's been working long hours, and has not had time to eat. You'd better buy her a sandwich.

    7. I have a ten-feet cord. ('feet' is wrong right? It should be 'foot'? Because adjectives don't take -ed- or -s?)
    It's not an adjective. It's a noun.

    It should be 'foot', but I don't think anyone can tell you why. 'Foot' and 'feet' have their own rules when they are used as units of measurement.

    Also correct is "I have a cord ten feet long" (or, less frequently, 'ten foot long').

    8. She is a commission-killer.
    This doesn't sound quite right.

    9. She is a commissioned-killer.
    She is a 'contract killer'. It sounds like she kills contracts, but actually, she murders people for money.

    "The prime minister was assasinated by a commissioned killer."
    This sounds okay, but 'commissioned killer' is not serving as a job title here. you can commission a killer, and so the killer was 'commissioned' but I would say that the person who was commissioned to commit the murder was a 'contract killer'.

    10. I get commission. (Profit from selling?)
    Well, someone else makes the profit, but yes, your 'commission' is a share of the profit from the sales that you make. We can talk about 'a 10% commision', for example.

    11. I get commissioned. (Does this mean that I was a salesperson with a hourly pay and now I am commissioned?)
    No.
    "I am a contract killer. I kill people for money. Sometimes I get commissioned to kill politicians."
    Last edited by TheMadBaron; 23-Nov-2004 at 12:07.

  9. #19
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    Default Re: Adjectives

    Thank you very much, TheMadBaron.

  10. #20
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    Default Re: Adjectives

    What do these mean?
    1. The book is printed in three different coloured inks. (The 'ink's are filled with colour?)
    2. The book is printed in three different colour inks. (What does this mean? If it is wrong, why?)

    3. This is a remote-control car. (Is 'control' an adjective here or is it a noun?)
    4. This is a remote-controlled car.

    5. You need to use a designated driver.
    6. You need to use a designate driver. (What does mean? Even though it is wrong, what does it mean? If it is incorrect, why?)
    Last edited by jack; 11-Dec-2004 at 02:40.

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