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Thread: e.g. vs i.e.

  1. Unregistered
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    Talking e.g. vs i.e.

    what is the exact proper way of incorporating the latin abbreviations i.e. and e.g., in other words do the follow a comma, preceed a comma, semicolon or what. Also should etc. always just be followed by one period? Also is it true that the registered trademark symbol should only be used in the first mention of a product in a document?

    Thank you,

    Eric Gunther

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #2

    Re: e.g. vs i.e.

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered
    what is the exact proper way of incorporating the latin abbreviations i.e. and e.g., in other words do they follow a comma, preceed a comma, semicolon or what. Also should etc. always just be followed by one period?
    e.g. (Latin exempli gratia, "for (the sake of) example")
    i.e. (Latin id est, "that is, or in other words")

    Note the typeface (roman or italic). Both e.g. and i.e. require a comma after the second period; however, you will find that not every writer follows the rule. Some writers even advise against using the comma: They see the comma as over punctuating an already heavily punctuated form.

    If e.g. and i.e. function as conjunctive adverbs, introductory elements, then they are preceeded by a semi-colon (;).

    Choose a common name; for example, choose either John or Mike.
    Choose a common name; e.g., John or Mike.

    Sample one worked; that is, sample one yeilded a positive result.
    Sample one worked; i.e., it yielded a positive result

    Sources: Lynch, Guide to Grammar and Style, Better Writing Skills, The Columbia Guide to Standard American English, Grammar for Geeks, Editing Tips, Webgrammar





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