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Thread: A red red rose?

  1. #1
    hanky is offline Key Member
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    Default A red red rose?

    In my own language, i. e. Vietnamese, we describe a color which is less red than "red" by repeating this color two times. E.x. we say "A red red rose" that means that rose's color is in between the red one and the pink one, it closer to the red one than to the pink one but not close enough to the red one to be red.
    The "A red red rose" is word-by-word translated from Vietnamese so I don't know whether it works in English or not? If not how do you describe the color I mentioned above?
    Thanks a lot.

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    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: A red red rose?

    'A red, red rose' would be very red. You could say 'A pale red.' or 'A light red.'

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    hanky is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: A red red rose?

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    'A red, red rose' would be very red. You could say 'A pale red.' or 'A light red.'
    Thank you. But this is not my question. My question: is that grammatical to say "a red red rose" (i.e with out the comas) and what does this mean in this case?

    Is is OK to say:

    a pink pink rose,
    a yellow yellow car,
    a blue blue eye.
    Thanks again.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: A red red rose?

    a pink pink rose, No, 'Very pink.'
    a yellow yellow car, No, 'Very yellow, or perhaps 'Bright yellow'.
    a blue blue eye. No, 'Very blue.'

  5. #5
    bhaisahab's Avatar
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    Default Re: A red red rose?

    A red red rose means a very red rose. In my opinion.

  6. #6
    jlinger is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: A red red rose?

    A Red, Red Rose
    by Robert Burns (1759–1796)

    O MY Luve 's like a red, red rose
    That 's newly sprung in June:
    O my Luve 's like the melodie
    That's sweetly play'd in tune!


    Of course, 250-yr old poetry is not a teaching example of correct modern usage, but the poem is incredibly familliar to English speakers, and thus you may hear the phrase, or a take-off of it ("a yellow yellow car") simply because that phrase in imbedded in our memory chips.

    For modern usage, bhaisahab is correct. "Red red" would mean you are stuck for words to describe just how incredibly red it is (and you would pause for effect after each "red"). Otherwise, use, as he suggests, "pale red" or "pink" or even "faded red."

  7. #7
    hanky is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: A red red rose?

    Quote Originally Posted by jlinger View Post
    A Red, Red Rose
    by Robert Burns (1759–1796)

    O MY Luve 's like a red, red rose
    That 's newly sprung in June:
    O my Luve 's like the melodie
    That's sweetly play'd in tune!


    Of course, 250-yr old poetry is not a teaching example of correct modern usage, but the poem is incredibly familliar to English speakers, and thus you may hear the phrase, or a take-off of it ("a yellow yellow car") simply because that phrase in imbedded in our memory chips.

    For modern usage, bhaisahab is correct. "Red red" would mean you are stuck for words to describe just how incredibly red it is (and you would pause for effect after each "red"). Otherwise, use, as he suggests, "pale red" or "pink" or even "faded red."
    Thank you so much, in Vietnamese, by word-to-word translation "a red, red rose" means "pale red".

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    Searching for language is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: A red red rose?

    The only way I have seen a "red, red rose," is also as JLinger explained it. More common in Canadian English, we would say a bright red is fire engine red, and a deep red would be a burgundy, like the wine. In German a deep red is called "weinrot" or wine red.

    As for the shades of yellow, for example, a bright yellow would be called a lemon yellow here, and a deeper one, perhaps a golden yellow
    Greens are described as mint, lime, grass or olive greens. Also a quite dark green is a hunter green.

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