Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    123
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default about AE pronunciation

    Hi teachers,

    Here is my question:
    I'm listening to Ann Cook's "AAT" in my spare time,she mentions that in standard AE,they omit the "t" sound in words,like sentence and eaten. It's also very common,in my ears, to hear American pronunce platinum and maintenance without "t" sound. They sound pretty familiar to me. I'm trying to train my ears better to catch how the American pronunce words since I have a big problem in pronunication and need to put a lot of efforts on it,I must admit. I want to know if that way of pronuncing words are
    common American?
    Standard American English?
    low class English?
    or absolutely correct?

    Could u pls explain to me a little about this? and what in Canadian way?R they speak the same way as the American in US?

    Thank you for your help.

    Amigo

  2. #2
    Steven D's Avatar
    Steven D is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    834
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: about AE pronunciation

    Quote Originally Posted by amigo
    Hi teachers,

    Here is my question:
    I'm listening to Ann Cook's "AAT" in my spare time,she mentions that in standard AE,they omit the "t" sound in words,like sentence and eaten. It's also very common,in my ears, to hear American pronunce platinum and maintenance without "t" sound. They sound pretty familiar to me. I'm trying to train my ears better to catch how the American pronunce words since I have a big problem in pronunication and need to put a lot of efforts on it,I must admit. I want to know if that way of pronuncing words are
    common American?
    Standard American English?
    low class English?
    or absolutely correct?

    Could u pls explain to me a little about this? and what in Canadian way?R they speak the same way as the American in US?

    Thank you for your help.

    Amigo
    The "t" sound is omitted in differerent words from time to time. When people speak quickly, this tends to happen. It's not a sign of low class English, but it's not absolutely correct. It is representative of how the language sounds. We can call this: informal, typical, ordinary, every day conversation.

    It depends on the person and the situation that one is speaking in. Different people will make it a point to use more careful pronunciation in certain situations. Some people might quite naturally switch back and forth from a more relaxed form of American English pronunciation to a more careful and standard form of American English pronunciation. It all depends on what the circumstance calls for. Then again, some people maintain the same manner of speaking for any situation.

    A student once pointed out to me that I left out the "t" in mountain. And I thought to myself, "mm..... So I did. I left out the "t". I once caught myself leaving out the "t" when I said "on the left side". This happens when people speak quickly.

    As far the words that you mentioned from the Ann Cook book go, I don't agree with that. I say the "t" in those words. I don't imagine that even when speaking quickly, I would leave out the "t" sound in those words.

    If you want a good perspective on American English pronunciation, I suggest the following:

    Listen to news announcers for good, careful, and standard pronunciation.

    Watch movies and listen to talk shows in order hear a more relaxed, but usual and normal, style of American English pronunciation.

    Different people in different situations speak differently. There is what I would call a "middle of the road area". However, it's very difficult to be precise about this. I suggest being very observant. Listen and imitate.
    Last edited by Steven D; 13-Nov-2004 at 23:41.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    12,971
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: about AE pronunciation

    Quote Originally Posted by amigo
    ...in standard AE, they omit the "t" sound in words, like sentence and eaten. It's also very common, in my ears, to hear American pronunce platinum and maintenance without "t" sound.
    It's referred to as reduced speech or relaxed speech, and it stems from ease of articulation. The [t] sound hasn't really been omitted; it has undergone a process of sound change. There are a number of processes: assimilation (t => n), reduction (t => '), elision (a vowel is omitted), and more, and those processes are predictable--they have rules. They are also present in all languages in the world, even yours. The processes are universal.

    1. sentence => sennence ([t] assimilate to [n])
    2. eaten => ea'en ([t] reduces to a glottal stop)
    3. platinum => pla'num (Same as above; is elided)
    4. maintenance => mai'nance ('n' is dropped, 'ten' is dropped)

    Here's an excellent book on relaxed/reduced pronunciation for students:
    Whaddaya say? Guided practice in relaxed spoken English. Weinstein, N. 1982. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Regents/Prentice Hall.

    Whaddaya = What did you

    Here's a page that lists a great deal of relaxed/reduced speech forms:
    http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Acropolis/8995/relaxed.html

    Quote Originally Posted by amigo
    I'm trying to train my ears better to catch how the American pronunce words since I have a big problem in pronunication and need to put a lot of efforts on it, I must admit. I want to know if that way of pronouncing words are common American? Standard American English? low class English? or absolutely correct?
    All of the above, and Canadian English is in general pretty much the same in terms of reduced speech. Again, the processes are universal, but that's not to say every dialect shares one and the same process. Check out the following sources:

    Building Fluency: A Pronunciation Course for Non-native speakers
    http://exchanges.state.gov/forum/vols/vol35/no1/p26.htm


    A List of Pronunciation (Audio) Resources on the Net
    http://home.apu.edu/~rrobison/Pronunciation%20Web%20Sites.htm

  4. #4
    Steven D's Avatar
    Steven D is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    834
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: about AE pronunciation

    Here's a page that lists a great deal of relaxed/reduced speech forms:
    http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Acropolis/8995/relaxed.html

    I've seen that site before. I don't think a number of those examples are really good representations of how the sounds are really made.

    Here's a common one, for example. This is not what we really say at all.

    DUNNO= DON'T KNOW
    Does she go with you? I dunno.

    It comes out sounding more like "Don' no" - Don't know.

    How does anyone hear any type of "u" sound there? I don't.

    Oh well...........

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    12,971
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: about AE pronunciation

    Quote Originally Posted by X Mode
    DUNNO= DON'T KNOW
    How does anyone hear any type of "u" sound there? I don't.
    Beats me, y'no.

  6. #6
    Steven D's Avatar
    Steven D is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    834
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: about AE pronunciation

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Beats me, y'no.
    I know.

    By the way, I think I do hear where the "t" is left out in "eaten". It's hard to tell. One shouldn't be so observant of one's own speech.

    Good post, by the way. I'm talkin' 'bout the big one in this thread.

    It's a good one.
    Last edited by Steven D; 15-Nov-2004 at 04:52.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    12,971
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: about AE pronunciation

    Oh, , thanks.

    Quote Originally Posted by X Mode
    I think do hear where the "t" is left out in "eaten". It's hard to tell. One shouldn't be so observant of one's own speech.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    123
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: about AE pronunciation

    Thanks y'all,teachers.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    12,971
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: about AE pronunciation

    You're welcome.

Similar Threads

  1. pronunciation
    By james_chew_84 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 09-Nov-2004, 08:15
  2. pronunciation
    By james_chew_84 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-Nov-2004, 09:42
  3. correct pronunciation of "Chaise" and "Chasis
    By amigo in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 29-Sep-2004, 06:03
  4. received pronunciation
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 21-Jun-2004, 00:25

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •