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  1. #1
    xixer alex Guest

    Commas for Subordinated Clauses

    Dear sir/madam

    I have been teaching high school students in Brazil for the last 12 years and I have a doubt which I would like to have cleared out. Is it possible to have a subordinated clause placed in front of the main clause without the use of a comma? Here is the sentence which was present in the University Entry Exam for the Federal University of the State of Santa Catarina.

    Depending on where you are going there are a number of suggested immunizations.

    Shouldn't there be a comma between "going" and "there are"?

    Like this:

    Depending on where you are going, there are a number of suggested immunizations.

    Thank you very much for your attention

  2. #2
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    Thumbs up Re: Commas for Subordinated Clauses

    Quote Originally Posted by xixer alex View Post
    Dear sir/madam

    I have been teaching high school students in Brazil for the last 12 years and I have a doubt which I would like to have cleared out. Is it possible to have a subordinated clause placed in front of the main clause without the use of a comma? Here is the sentence which was present in the University Entry Exam for the Federal University of the State of Santa Catarina.

    Depending on where you are going there are a number of suggested immunizations.

    Shouldn't there be a comma between "going" and "there are"?

    Like this:

    Depending on where you are going, there are a number of suggested immunizations.

    Thank you very much for your attention


    Yours is a very good question
    In many grammar books that 'rule' appears, but then, when paying close attention to texts in general, you will find many sentences like the one you've posted.
    I would say that the use of a comma in sentences like this is a 'preferred form' which may mark a sense/breath group (a rule prescribed to avoid misreading of sentences that are too long, which is not the case of this sentence, or perhaps to avoid misunderstanding an ambiguous sentence)
    We have also found cases like this at university (with a subordinated clause at the beginning of a sentence and without a comma at the end of the clause), and also cases of non-defining relative clauses without commas.

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