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  1. #1
    thedaffodils's Avatar
    thedaffodils is offline Key Member
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    Question none of you [have to] or [has to]?

    Could you tell me which key is correct? I think a) is correct because it follows "you". Am I right?


    Can we leave before the game is over?"

    "Of course, none of you_________stay if you don't want to."
    a)have to
    b)had better
    c)has to
    d)would like to

    And if 'none' is the subject, I think it is okay to use verb either in plural or singular form. Am I right?

    I found an example sentence from the Cambrdige Dictionary as below.

    None of my children has/have blonde hair.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Dawood Usmani's Avatar
    Dawood Usmani is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: none of you [have to] or [has to]?

    It is widely asserted that none is equivalent to no one, and hence requires a singular verb and singular pronoun: None of the prisoners was given his soup. It is true that none is etymologically derived from the Old English word n, "one," but the word has been used as both a singular and a plural noun from Old English onward. The plural usage appears in the King James Bible as well as the works of John Dryden and Edmund Burke and is widespread in the works of respectable writers today. Of course, the singular usage is perfectly acceptable. The choice between a singular or plural verb depends on the desired effect. Both options are acceptable in this sentence: None of the conspirators has (or have) been brought to trial. When none is modified by almost, however, it is difficult to avoid treating the word as a plural: Almost none of the officials were (not was) interviewed by the committee. None can only be plural in its use in sentences such as None but his most loyal supporters believe (not believes) his story.
    Hope this helps!
    Dawood

  3. #3
    thedaffodils's Avatar
    thedaffodils is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: none of you [have to] or [has to]?

    Hi Dawood,

    Thank you very much for your answer. You're helpful.


  4. #4
    tedtmc is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: none of you [have to] or [has to]?

    "Of course, none of you has/have to stay if you don't want to."
    I would prefer:
    "Of course, you don't have to stay if you don't want to."

    not a teacher

  5. #5
    thedaffodils's Avatar
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    Default Re: none of you [have to] or [has to]?

    Quote Originally Posted by tedtmc View Post
    I would prefer:
    "Of course, you don't have to stay if you don't want to."

    not a teacher
    Hi Tedtmc,

    Thank you for your response. I have to choose any of them -A,B,C or D; I am not allowed to create any new answer.

    Dawood has helped me out.
    Last edited by thedaffodils; 13-Dec-2008 at 07:05.

  6. #6
    2006 is offline Banned
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    Default Re: none of you [have to] or [has to]?

    Quote Originally Posted by thedaffodils View Post
    Could you tell me which key is correct? I think a) is correct because it follows "you". Am I right? Yes.


    Can we leave before the game is over?"

    "Of course, none of you_________stay if you don't want to."
    a)have to
    b)had better
    c)has to
    d)would like to

    And if 'none' is the subject, I think it is okay to use verb either in plural or singular form. Am I right?

    I found an example sentence from the Cambrdige Dictionary as below.

    None of my children has/have blonde hair. have

    Thanks!
    I have to leave now; I will comment more tomorrow.

  7. #7
    2006 is offline Banned
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    Default Re: none of you [have to] or [has to]?

    Generally, in North American English the verb matches the noun or pronoun which it is related to. So both singular and plural verbs are used with "none".
    None of my children have blond hair.

    None of the grapes are edible. (here "none" means 'not (even) one'.
    None of the apple is edible. (here "none" means 'no part'.

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