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Thread: How are you?

  1. #1
    Shaikh Anwar Ali. Guest

    Default How are you?

    I would like to say thanks to you because you have taken this sort of things on the web site for us.I want to ask to you that where can we use (watcha)
    I have understood untill that what is meaning of watcha and another question that can we idoms in formal conversation.Ok.I am waiting to your reply.Till then.

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: How are you?

    Watcha = hi, hello.
    This is colloquial. We can use idioms in formal language as long as they aren't slang or colloquial.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: How are you?

    Quote Originally Posted by Shaikh Anwar Ali.
    I would like to say thanks to you because you have taken this sort of things on the web site for us.I want to ask to you that where can we use (watcha). I have understood until that what is meaning of watcha and another question that can we idoms in formal conversation.Ok.I am waiting to your reply.Till then.
    Welcome.

    Whatcha? is a reduction. It means, What are you?

    EX: Whatcha doing? (What are you doing?)

    whatyou => whachou => whachou => whacha

    Whaddya? is also a reduction, and it means, What do you..?

    EX: Whaddya think? (What do you think?)

    whatdoyou => whaddayou => whaddaya

    Reduced forms like, whatcha and whaddya are also called relax speech and fast speech. Some people might call reduced forms slang, but they are not slang, and they are not idioms.

    Reduced forms are the result of natural language processes, and those processes are universal. That is, you can hear them in every human language.

    The reason speakers reduce phrases has to do with ease of articulation. It's easier on the articulators (tongue, teeth, lips, etc.). Even professors can be heard to say, "Whatcha" and "Whaddya".

    As for when to use reduced forms, well, you can use your judgement since the same speech processes that produce "Whatcha" are active in all languages, even in your native language. In English, speakers tend not to use reduced forms in formal situations or situations in which a non-reduced form expresses the meaning with more clarity.

    Mother: What are you doing?
    Small child: I washing my doll.

    Mother: Whatcha doing?
    Older child: I'm watching TV.

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