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    #1

    The difference gets tacked onto the principal?

    The following lines are from the TV show The Sopranos.
    A guy named David owes Rich some money.
    Here is their conversation.

    David: Hey, Rich. That envelope's two C's shy. I'll catch up on it next week. It's no problem. I just got caught a little off guard this month. You know, I took a second on the house, didn't calculate into my budget. No biggie.

    Rich: No good, davie.

    David: It's just a stutter step. Like I said, it's no biggie.

    Rich: The difference gets tacked onto the principle.
    I have two questions.

    • What does "two C's shy" mean? I know shy means shylock. But what does "C" mean?


    • What's the meaning of the difference gets tacked onto the principle? What does "difference" mean here?


    Thank you.

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    #2

    Re: The difference gets tacked onto the principal?

    "2 c's shy" means 2 hundred dollars short.
    "shy" means lacking or short here.

    Example: She is just shy of the world's record . . .

    This conversation sounds like a loan has been given to David. He is making payments. He is two hundred dollars short in this payment. Rich says that now the $200 will be considered as part of the principle of the loan (the orginal amount borrowed) David probably has to pay a high interest rate for this loan.

  1. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: The difference gets tacked onto the principal?

    In US currency, the nickname for a $100 bill is a "C note," because the Roman numeral for 100 is "C."

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