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Thread: Using "for"

  1. #1
    Unregistered Guest

    Default Using "for"

    Why do I need to put "for" in front of rain and fair skies in the following sentence?

    According to the weather report the outlook for tomorrow is for rain
    in the early part of the day and later for fair skies.

    What's the difference between the first "for" used (for tomorrow) and the other two?
    Thank you.

  2. #2
    TheMadBaron Guest

    Default Re: Using "for"

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered
    Why do I need to put "for" in front of rain and fair skies in the following sentence?

    According to the weather report the outlook for tomorrow is for rain
    in the early part of the day and later for fair skies.
    Let's start with a simpler sentence (the outlook for later today, perhaps?)....
    "According to the weather report the outlook is for rain."
    Now let's try dropping 'for', and see what happens....
    "According to the weather report the outlook is rain".
    It doesn't quite work. The words 'outlook' and 'rain' are not synonymous, or even related. The outlook is the outlook, and rain is rain. You can say that the poodle is a dog, but it would be a bit strange to say that the outlook is rain.

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