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  1. #1
    Deepurple is offline Member
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    Default Spare effort or spare no effort?

    I would like to know whether the "no" is needed in the following sentence or not.

    "Thank you Mr. A for sparing the time and (no) effort in assisting the set-up of the committee."

    Thank for helping.

  2. #2
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    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: Spare effort or spare no effort?

    The collocation is 'spare no effort', but sounds very odd in conjunction with 'spare the time'. So in this context it'd be better to say 'for spending the time and effort' or use two different verbs - 'for taking the time and sparing no effort'.

    Good question though. 'Sparing the time and no effort' comes quite close to Syllepsis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia , but I don't think it is, quite, as the verb doesn't change meaning with respect to its two objects; but as the first object is literal ('spare time') and the second is figurative and hyperbolic ('spare no effort') the two objects don't sit comfortably together. (That's my view anyway, I think. Maybe other teachers disagree... )

    b

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    Deepurple is offline Member
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    Default Re: Spare effort or spare no effort?

    Thanks, BobK. But was there any such collocation as "spare the effort"?
    As according to the definition of Longman Dictionary, spare may mean "give".
    So, to my understanding, spare the effort is tantamount to "give the effort" Am I right?

    Longman's
    ▶GIVE◀
    to make something such as time, money, or workers available for someone, especially when this is difficult for you to do
    Sorry, I can't spare the time .
    I'd like you to come over when you can spare a couple of hours.
    Can you spare 5?

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    susiedqq is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: Spare effort or spare no effort?

    "Thank you Mr. A for sparing the time and (no) effort in assisting the set-up of the committee."

    This sentence attempts to combine the concepts of spare time and spare no effort. But they don't share the same meaning for the word "spare."

    You would have to complete the entire thought to get the real meaning.

    "Thank you Mr. A for sparing the time and sparing no effort in assisting the set-up of the committee."

    I'd change it to "taking the time" and "sparing no effort" . . .

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