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  1. #1
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    Default Countable / Uncountable Words

    What do these mean?
    1. The weather forecast warned of winds of up to 60-miles-an-hour today. (Why is 'winds' plural? What does it mean?)
    2. The weather forecast warned of wind of up to 60-miles-an-hour today. (What does this mean?)

  2. #2
    Nahualli Guest

    Default Re: Countable / Uncountable Words

    TECHNICALLY they are both correct. PRACTICALLY only winds is used. Why? I don't know.... it just came into use with wind..

    -M-

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Countable / Uncountable Words

    Thanks.
    http://dictionary.cambridge.org/defi...1093&dict=CALD

    candy:
    noun [C or U] US
    a sweet food made from sugar or chocolate, or a piece of this:

    Are these correct? What do they mean?
    1. I have a box of candy. (Why isn't 'candy' 'candies'? Eg. A box of apples. You cannot say A box of apple. Is it because candy is not countable? Why isn't candy countable? )
    2. I have a box of candies. (What does this mean? If it is not correct, why?)

    So 'candy' is not countable and 'candies' is countable? When would I use 'candy' and 'candies'? Could you give me an example for each of them.

  4. #4
    AintFoolin Guest

    Default Re: Countable / Uncountable Words

    yup, you got it

    you can use whatever you want whenever you want as long as it makes grammatical sense

    that said, no one uses the phrase 'box of candies', I would stick with 'candy' unless there was a compelling reason otherwise.

    He ate a lot of candy - OK (preferred)
    He ate a lot of candies - OK
    He ate 10 pieces of candy straight from the box - OK (preferred)
    He ate 10 candies straight from the box - OK
    He ate 10 candy straight from the box - NOT OK
    Last edited by AintFoolin; 06-Dec-2004 at 08:38.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Countable / Uncountable Words

    Thanks.

    that said, no one uses the phrase 'box of candies', I would stick with 'candy' unless there was a compelling reason otherwise.
    1. I have a box of candies. (So what does this mean? Candy bars?)
    2. I have a box of candy. (How come this is correct though? I have 'box' here, doesn't that make 'candy' plural? What does this sentence mean? Sugar?)

    3. I have a box of apple. (Is this incorrect? If so, why? #2 Is correct but this isn't? Does this sentence mean I have a box of apple flesh?)

    He ate a lot of candy - OK (preferred)
    4. He ate a lot of candy. (Does this mean he ate a lot of sweet stuff?)

    He ate a lot of candies - OK
    5. He ate a lof ot candies. ('Candies' as in chocolate bars right? Or something that is countable?)
    Last edited by jack; 06-Dec-2004 at 09:34.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Countable / Uncountable Words

    candy can be count or non-count:

    Non-count: How much candy did you eat? I ate half the jar.
    Count: How many candies did you eat? I had only one candy.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Countable / Uncountable Words

    1. I have a box of candies.
    For Eg.:
    1. I have a basket of fries.
    2. I have a basket of fry. ('fry' is wrong here? Because 'basket' makes 'fry' plural? How come #3 is correct but this is not correct?)

    3. I have a box of candy. (How come 'candy' is not candies? I have 'box' here? How come it isn't like #1? )

  8. #8
    Nahualli Guest

    Default Re: Countable / Uncountable Words

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    For Eg.:
    1. I have a basket of fries.
    2. I have a basket of fry. ('fry' is wrong here? Because 'basket' makes 'fry' plural? How come #3 is correct but this is not correct?)

    3. I have a box of candy. (How come 'candy' is not candies? I have 'box' here? How come it isn't like #1? )
    It's an irregular plural. That's about all there is to it. About 80% of learning a second language is learning the system and how *most* words are formed and used. 15% is simply memorizing the irregularities. The last 5% is mere luck and guesswork.

    -Nah-

  9. #9
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
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    Smile Re: Countable / Uncountable Words

    Re:
    4. He ate a lot of candy. (Does this mean he ate a lot of sweet stuff?)
    The answer to the question is yes and no, That is, candy is sweet, but it is a particular kind of sweet. Cake, pie, and sweet rolls are sweet, but they are not candy.


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    Default Re: Countable / Uncountable Words

    Thanks.

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