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  1. #1
    hela is offline Senior Member
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    Default rules and exercises on intensifiers

    Hello everyone,

    I'm looking for exercises on the web which would help me understand the difference in meaning, and use, between the following intensifiers:

    so / so ... that; such / such a ... that; very; too; enough / enough ... to.

    Do you know of any other problematic constructions?
    Would you please tell me where I can find such exercises?

    I have found the following instructions on intensifiers :

    “Avoid using so as an intensifier, as in "It's so hot." "So" on its own, where "very" belongs, is a no-no.”

    I didn’t understand the last sentence. Would you please explain it to me?

    Thanks a lot.

  2. #2
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: rules and exercises on intensifiers

    Quote Originally Posted by hela
    Hello everyone,

    I'm looking for exercises on the web which would help me understand the difference in meaning, and use, between the following intensifiers:

    so / so ... that; such / such a ... that; very; too; enough / enough ... to.

    Do you know of any other problematic constructions?
    Would you please tell me where I can find such exercises?

    I have found the following instructions on intensifiers :

    “Avoid using so as an intensifier, as in "It's so hot." "So" on its own, where "very" belongs, is a no-no.”

    I didn’t understand the last sentence. Would you please explain it to me?

    Thanks a lot.
    A "no-no" is something that shouldn't be done. In this case, it's something that shouldn't be used. In any case, "so" is indeed used as an intensifier in informal English.


  3. #3
    Steven D's Avatar
    Steven D is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: rules and exercises on intensifiers

    I don't understand how "so" can be considered informal.

    It's so warm out today. - correct sentence. What's so "informal" about it?


    I have found the following instructions on intensifiers :

    “Avoid using so as an intensifier, as in "It's so hot." "So" on its own, where "very" belongs, is a no-no.”

    I didn’t understand the last sentence. Would you please explain it to me?

    Thanks a lot.
    There's no reason to avoid using "so" as an intensifier. It would be considered informal and not standard before a noun, however.

    http://dictionary.cambridge.org/defi...5306&dict=CALD

    1. To a great extent; to such an evident degree: But the idea is so obvious.
    The above example sentence from the American Heritage Dictionary is correct. Why would anyone consider it to be a "no-no"?

  4. #4
    Steven D's Avatar
    Steven D is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: rules and exercises on intensifiers

    Critics have sometimes objected to the use of so as an intensive meaning “to a great degree or extent,” as in We were so relieved to learn that the deadline had been extended. This usage is most common in informal contexts, perhaps because, unlike the neutral very, it presumes that the listener or reader will be sympathetic to the speaker's evaluation of the situation.

    usage note excerpt

    http://dictionary.reference.com/search?r=8&q=so

    I don't pay attention to such "critics". In the context of English language learning and speaking "so" as an intensifier is a "can say". You can say "It's so warm in here.", for example. I don't see why it should be called informal. It's just part of speaking English. Neither do I see anything wrong with using "so" as an intensifier in writing.

  5. #5
    hela is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: rules and exercises on intensifiers

    Thank you all for your explanations.

    Here's an another question: Would you please help me correct this exercise?
    Number 14 is rather urgent, Would you please answer this question today if possible?

    Rewrite the following sentences using an intensifier where appropriate.

    1) There were many flamingos flying over the lake. (so many)
    (can we say “such many” in certain cases?)

    2) Many people think the way I do. (very many / so many ?)

    3) There were many more … (so many more)
    (would you please help me finish that sentence?)

    4) She did it well. (very / so well)
    (is there a difference in meaning between “very” and “so” here?)

    5) I was disappointed because I had tried hard. (very / so hard ??)
    (same question as above)

    6) The bus was crowded. (very / so crowded ?)

    7) I can’t drink this coffee because it’s hot.
    a) (very / too hot) (is there a difference here between “very” and “too”?)
    b) This coffee is so hot that I can’t drink it.

    8) I can hardly hold my pen because my hands are cold.
    a) (very cold) / (too cold ?)
    b) My hands are so cold that I can hardly hold my pen.

    9) No one ever talks to him because he’s a rude man.

    a) (a very rude man / too rude a man ?) (what’s the difference between the 2 constructions?)

    b) He’s such a rude man that no one ever talks to him.

    10) Was it expensive to buy? (too / so / very expensive ?)

    11) There were people there. (too / so many people)

    12) It looks nice. (very / so nice ?)

    13) It was good of you to help us. (so good of you ?)

    14) It's such lovely weather / It's such a lovely weather ?

    Thank you very much for your help.
    Best regards.
    Last edited by hela; 22-Nov-2004 at 18:08.

  6. #6
    hela is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: rules and exercises on intensifiers

    Good evening everyone,

    May I have an answer to sentence number 14, please?

    Thanks a lot.

  7. #7
    Steven D's Avatar
    Steven D is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: rules and exercises on intensifiers

    14) It's such lovely weather / It's such a lovely weather?


    Good evening everyone,

    May I have an answer to sentence number 14, please?

    Thanks a lot.
    Because "weather" is an uncountable noun, we don't use an indefinite article before it. An indefinite article would mean "one". We can't say "one weather".

    It's such lovely weather. - correct

    It's such a lovely weather. - incorrect

  8. #8
    hela is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: rules and exercises on intensifiers

    Dear teachers,

    I have some hesitation about the following sentences. Would you please tell me which ones are incorrect?

    1) He is such a rude man to talk to.
    2) No one ever talks to such a rude man.
    3) No one ever talks to him because he is such a rude man (grammatically correct?)

    4) I have too little time to help you.
    5) I haven't too much time to help you.

    Many thanks,
    Hela

  9. #9
    RonBee's Avatar
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    Default Re: rules and exercises on intensifiers

    Quote Originally Posted by hela
    Dear teachers,

    I have some hesitation about the following sentences. Would you please tell me which ones are incorrect?

    1) He is such a rude man to talk to.
    2) No one ever talks to such a rude man.
    3) No one ever talks to him because he is such a rude man (grammatically correct?)

    4) I have too little time to help you.
    5) I haven't too much time to help you.
    For the first one, try:
    He is a difficult man to talk to.
    The second is okay, but you can do better. Try:
    People don't like talking to such a rude man as he is.
    Number three is correct (but put a comma after him.)

    For the fifth one, try:
    I haven't enough time to help you.

  10. #10
    hela is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: rules and exercises on intensifiers

    Dear teachers,

    Would you please tell me which of the following sentences are possible ? Do they have the same meaning ?

    1) That book is so boring that I cannot finish it. =

    a) That book is too boring to finish (?)
    b) That book is too boring to be finished.
    c) That book is too boring for me to finish.

    2) My uncle has so much money that he can buy an airplane. =

    a) My uncle has such a lot of money that he can buy an airplane (?)

    3) My uncle is so stingy that his wife has left him. =

    a) My uncle is stingy enough for his wife to have left him (this is the you have corrected)

    b) My uncle is too stingy to live with (?)

    Thanks again.
    All the best,
    Hela

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