Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: older

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    146
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default older

    The name of the daisy has an interesting origin. The word "daisy" means "day's eye" and comes form an older Anglo-Saxon word. (Hi, I have a question about "older" in this sentence. Why it says "older Anglo-Saxon word"? If I use "old Anglo-Saxon word", then... Is there a difference between "older" and "old" ? ) The English daisy folds up its rays at night and unfolds them again at dawn - the "eye of the day" or day's eye." ... ...


    Thanks for your help.

  2. #2
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    22,728
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: older

    Yes, you can say 'old Anglo-Saxon' or 'Old English'.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    146
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: older

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Yes, you can say 'old Anglo-Saxon' or 'Old English'.
    Hi, bhaisahab,

    Thanks for your help.

    Okay, I get it. But I can not figure out, in this sentence, why does it use "older Anglo-Saxon word"? Is a difference between "older" and "old" ?


  4. #4
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    22,728
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: older

    The Old English word is dægesege (daisy) from the Anglo-Saxon dæges eage (days eye).

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    146
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: older

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    The Old English word is dægesege (daisy) from the Anglo-Saxon dæges eage (days eye).
    Hi, bhaisahab,

    Thanks for your reply.

    But... What I meant is, okay, here is the original sentence: . The word "daisy" means "day's eye" and comes form an older Anglo-Saxon word.

    In this sentence, which says " an older Anglo-Saxon word". And what I can not figure out is, if I use "an old Anglo-Saxon word". Then is there a difference between "older" and "old" ?

  6. #6
    2006 is offline Banned
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    4,161
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: older

    Quote Originally Posted by IMPSX-UE View Post
    Hi, bhaisahab,

    Thanks for your help.

    Okay, I get it. But I can not figure out, in this sentence, why does it use "older Anglo-Saxon word"? Is a difference between "older" and "old" ?

    Presumably it says "older" because the word daisy comes from an Anglo-Saxon word that is older than the word daisy.

    But since it is obvious that any word can only come from a word that is older than itself, "older" is a questionable choice.

    I think '...comes from an old Anglo-Saxon word.' would be better.

  7. #7
    2006 is offline Banned
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    4,161
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: older

    "Why it says older Anglo-Saxon word?" is not the correct grammar for asking a question.

    Say 'Why does it say older Anglo-Saxon word?'.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    146
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: older

    Quote Originally Posted by 2006 View Post
    Presumably it says "older" because the word daisy comes from an Anglo-Saxon word that is older than the word daisy.

    But since it is obvious that any word can only come from a word that is older than itself, "older" is a questionable choice.

    I think '...comes from an old Anglo-Saxon word.' would be better.
    Hi, 2006,

    It is good to see you here !

    Yes, I think you are right and that is where I can not figure out. Why does she (the professor) use "older", why not just "old" ? Since I am not a native speaker, I just wondered if there a reason that she uses "older".

    According to my script, she does say "older", not "old".

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    146
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: older

    Quote Originally Posted by 2006 View Post
    "Why it says older Anglo-Saxon word?" is not the correct grammar for asking a question.

    Say 'Why does it say older Anglo-Saxon word?'.
    2006, you are right, I will correct it !

    Thanks.

  10. #10
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    22,728
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: older

    Quote Originally Posted by IMPSX-UE View Post
    Hi, 2006,

    It is good to see you here !

    Yes, I think you are right and that is where I can not figure out. Why does she (the professor) use "older", why not just "old" ? Since I am not a native speaker, I just wondered if there a reason that she uses "older".

    According to my script, she does say "older", not "old".
    Maybe she is saying, or meant to say, that 'daisy' comes from the Old English word dægesege, which itself comes from the older Anglo-Saxon dæges eage.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Teaching older learners
    By hannah1985 in forum Teaching English
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 07-Dec-2007, 01:56
  2. elder and older
    By vannak in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 03-Aug-2007, 13:13
  3. Older or Elder, please, help me
    By schoolman in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 18-Feb-2007, 12:03
  4. Older and elder
    By shikha_kandwal in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 13-Jul-2006, 14:07
  5. elder and older
    By kong vannak in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-Feb-2006, 00:13

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •