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Thread: For


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
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    #1

    For

    Scenario:

    I am working right now and I am the hiring guy for my store. My employee pages me and says:

    Employee:
    1. Jack please come to the customer service area for (a/the) interview. (Is this correct without the determiner? If, so why?)
    2. Jack please come to the customer service area for an interview. (I know this is correct, but this is not what I am trying to say. I am trying to tell Jack to come here and interview this person.)


    • Join Date: Jun 2004
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    #2

    Re: For

    Jack, please come over/go to the customer service area to interview a candidate.

    FRC


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
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    #3

    Re: For

    Thanks.

    So I cannot say this:
    1. Jack please come to the customer service area for interview. (If I can say this, how come I don't need a determiner? Or does this sentence mean something else?)

  1. Mister Micawber's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: For

    (1) a determiner is needed. 'Interview' is a singular countable noun, which always takes an article, a demonstrative adjective, or a possessive.

    (2) It can mean either, and it is fine for your purpose, because the character 'Jack' knows that,as the hirer, he gives the interviews, not undergoes them. Don't forget how important context always is for language interpretation.


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    #5

    Re: For

    Thanks.

    So for this one:
    1. Jack please come to the customer service area for an interview.
    2. Jack please come to the customer service area for the interview.
    How do I know which one to use?
    Last edited by jack; 21-Nov-2004 at 14:12.

  2. TheMadBaron
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    #6

    Re: For

    If The employee knows you are expecting the candidate, he'll probably say "the interview".

    If candidates may just arrive when they wish, without prior arrangement, he'd say "an interview."


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    #7

    Re: For

    Thanks.


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    #8

    Re: For

    1. Who wants to go on the trip for discount? (Is this correct? If not, why? Can 'discount' be uncountable? If I want it to be uncountable is this correct?)
    2. Who wants to go on the trip for (a/the) discount? (If this is correct, why? Why do I need to use a determiner?)

    3. I want five slices of apple. (I don't have to use a determiner bwetween 'of' and 'apple'? Why is #1 incorrect and #3 is correct?)

  3. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #9

    Re: For

    I want a discount.
    I want five slices of apple.

    The underlined portion functions as a modifier.


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    #10

    Re: For

    Thanks.


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