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Thread: Synonymous


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    #1

    Synonymous

    Do these mean the same thing?

    1. How is your studying going?
    2. How is your study going?

  1. Mister Micawber's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Synonymous

    Often, but not always precisely, Jack. (2) can often mean a larger, defined research project, rather than simply homework, which is what (1) usually means.


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    #3

    Re: Synonymous

    Thanks.


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    #4

    Re: Synonymous

    Are these synonymous? What do they mean?

    1. Do you want to go excercise?
    2. Do you want to go and excercise?

  2. TheMadBaron
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    #5

    Re: Synonymous

    They mean the same thing. The first is colloquial, and ungrammatical. The second is more widely accepted.
    Last edited by TheMadBaron; 23-Nov-2004 at 10:36.

  3. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #6

    Re: Synonymous

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    Are these synonymous? What do they mean?

    1. Do you want to go excercise?
    2. Do you want to go and excercise?
    They express different events. Sentence 1. expresses one event: go exercise, whereas 2. expresses two separate events: first go and then exercise.

    2. Do you want to go and (then) do you want to exercise?

    Speakers often add and where they shouldn't. The assumption is that since 'go' and 'exercise' are two different verbs, they should be separated by and.

    EX: Let's go walk and look at the stars. (Two events, OK)
    EX: Let's go look at the stars. (One event, OK)

    EX: Let's go and look at the stars. (Two events, OK)
    EX: Let's go and look at the stars. (One event, Not OK. Delete 'and')

  4. TheMadBaron
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    #7

    Re: Synonymous

    It would apparently depend on whether you're talking to an American / Canadian or to a Brit.... "go walk", "go look" and "go excercise" sound as wrong to me as "Let's go and look at the stars" sounds to Casiopea. They're both wrong.... and they're both common, depending on where you are.

    If 'go exercise' refers to one event, then you could just say "Let's exercise."
    Last edited by TheMadBaron; 23-Nov-2004 at 14:58.


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    #8

    Re: Synonymous

    Thanks.

    I don't really get this one:
    EX: Let's go and look at the stars. (One event, Not OK. Delete 'and')
    Are you saying if I'm using this for one event, it is not okay unless I delete 'and'?

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    #9

    Re: Synonymous


    Dear Casiopea,
    I got confused by the sentence " Let's go look at the stars". Is "look" a verb? If it is the how can we put two verbs together? If it isn't then should we say Let's go for a look at the stars" as we say " Let's go for a walk"?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.

    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    They express different events. Sentence 1. expresses one event: go exercise, whereas 2. expresses two separate events: first go and then exercise.

    2. Do you want to go and (then) do you want to exercise?

    Speakers often add and where they shouldn't. The assumption is that since 'go' and 'exercise' are two different verbs, they should be separated by and.

    EX: Let's go walk and look at the stars. (Two events, OK)
    EX: Let's go look at the stars. (One event, OK)

    EX: Let's go and look at the stars. (Two events, OK)
    EX: Let's go and look at the stars. (One event, Not OK. Delete 'and')

  5. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #10

    Re: Synonymous

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    EX: Let's go and look.
    Are you saying if I'm using this for one event, it is not okay unless I delete 'and'?
    Yes. If your intention is to express a single event, then use 'go look' (2), and if your intention is to express two separate events, one after the other, then add 'and' as in 'go and look' (1):

    (1) Let's go and look. (two separate events 'go' and 'look')
    (2) Let's go look. (one event 'go look')
    (3)*Let's go and look. (two separate events used to express a single event)

    Sentence (3) is grammatical if it is used to express two separate events, but if used to express a single event then it's ungrammatical in terms of the semantics of English.

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