Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 11 to 18 of 18

Thread: Apostrophe

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #11

    Re: Apostrophe

    1. is incorrect. Try, six months (of) credit on electrical goods.
    2. is incorrect. A plural noun is functioning as an adjective.
    3. is fine. six-month functions as an adjective.
    4. is incorrect for the same reason as 2.


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
    • Posts: 1,344
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #12

    Re: Apostrophe


    1. is incorrect. Try, six months (of) credit on electrical goods.


    http://dictionary.cambridge.org/defi...8165&dict=CALD
    1. The shop was offering six months' (interest-free) credit on electrical goods. (So Cambridge Dictionary is wrong? Or 'of' is omitted there because there is an aspotrophe after 'months'?)

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #13

    Re: Apostrophe

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    1. The shop was offering six months' (interest-free) credit on electrical goods.

    So Cambridge Dictionary is wrong? Or 'of' is omitted there because there is an aspotrophe after 'months'?)
    A credit of six months ~ six months of credit
    six months' worth of credit ~ credit of six months' worth


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
    • Posts: 1,344
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #14

    Re: Apostrophe

    six months' worth of credit ~ credit of six months' worth
    Are these correct? What do they mean?
    1. The shop was offering six months worth of credit. (If this is wrong, why?)
    2. The shop was offering six months' worth of credit. (What's the point of using an apostrophe here?)

    Thanks in advance.

  3. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #15

    Re: Apostrophe

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    Are these correct? What do they mean?
    1. The shop was offering six months worth of credit. (If this is wrong, why?)
    2. The shop was offering six months' worth of credit. (What's the point of using an apostrophe here?)

    Thanks in advance.
    six months (noun) worth (noun) => six months' worth

    a worth of six months ~ six months' worth


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
    • Posts: 1,344
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #16

    Re: Apostrophe

    Thanks.

    a worth of six months ~ six months' worth
    1. six months' (Isn't this noun+noun too?)

  4. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #17

    Re: Apostrophe

    It's adjective+possessive noun.

  5. Reemy's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Jordan
      • Current Location:
      • Jordan

    • Join Date: Dec 2004
    • Posts: 311
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #18

    Re: Apostrophe

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    http://dictionary.cambridge.org/defi...8165&dict=CALD

    Are these correct? What do they mean?
    1. The shop was offering six months' credit on electrical goods.
    2. The shop was offering six months credit on electrical goods. (If this is wrong, why?)

    3. The shop was offering a six-month credit on electrical goods. (If this is correct, why? Cambridge says 'credit' is uncountable? How come I can use the determiner here?)
    4. The shop was offering a six-months credit on electrical goods. (Is 'months' supposed to be 'month'? Because it is an adjective?)

    Dear Jack
    Sentence #1 is correct, the –s genitive is used here with inanimate noun (temporal noun), as when we say "a week's holiday".

    Sentence#2 has an incorrect form, the plural form is needless here. To express a period of time you can say six-month credit.

    Sentence #3 is partially correct following the grammatical rule in expressing periods of time as in saying five- day visit. However it is incorrect to use a determiner (a) before "credit" which is uncountable noun.

    As for sentence #4 as you said the construction six-month comes as an adjective (a premodifier) in which plural nouns usually become singular, so it should not be in plural form.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Similar Threads

  1. genetives (apostrophe)
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-Sep-2004, 21:48
  2. Use of apostrophe
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-Mar-2004, 19:51
  3. Putting the apostrophe inthe right place
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-Feb-2004, 23:42
  4. apostrophe
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-Jan-2004, 21:59
  5. using apostrophe in week and weeks
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-Dec-2003, 13:41

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •