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  1. #1
    juliana0403 is offline Member
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    has lived vs has been living

    Hi guys..

    What are diffrences between two tenses below ?

    He has lived here for 5 years.
    He has been living here for 5 years.

    Thank you.^^

  2. #2
    abaka is offline Senior Member
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    Re: has lived vs has been living

    In this case, none really, since to live is a continuous process.

    I think, however, that "he has lived here for five years" is stylistically more formal and literary than "he has been living here for five years", which is perfectly acceptable vernacular.

  3. #3
    rajan is offline Member
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    Re: has lived vs has been living

    I am not a teacher, I would like to try:

    In First one person gives stress on the result of having been here for 5 years. eg He has lived there for 5 years and nothing has yet changed around him.

    In Second one Person gives stress on the time period.

    If I am wrong, please do let me know also for my knowledge


    11
    Quote Originally Posted by juliana0403 View Post
    Hi guys..

    What are diffrences between two tenses below ?

    He has lived here for 5 years.
    He has been living here for 5 years.

    Thank you.^^

  4. #4
    abaka is offline Senior Member
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    Re: has lived vs has been living

    Quote Originally Posted by rajan View Post
    I am not a teacher, I would like to try:

    In First one person gives stress on the result of having been here for 5 years. eg He has lived there for 5 years and nothing has yet changed around him.

    In Second one Person gives stress on the time period.

    If I am wrong, please do let me know also for my knowledge


    11
    That is a very good way of putting it. I think, though, that this distinction in meaning is such a fine one that it is scarcely noticeable without deep analysis, and that here the basic stylistic difference is more quickly perceived.

  5. #5
    Roselin's Avatar
    Roselin is offline Key Member
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    Re: has lived vs has been living

    Quote Originally Posted by juliana0403 View Post
    Hi guys..

    What are diffrences between two tenses below ?

    He has lived here for 5 years. Has lived means not living here anymore.

    He has been living here for 5 years. HAS BEEN LIVING means he is still living in the same place and it's been 5 years that he is there.

    Thank you.^^
    In the first one.......the action of living has overed whereas in the second one it is still continue.

  6. #6
    jctgf is offline Key Member
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    Re: has lived vs has been living

    Quote Originally Posted by Roselin View Post
    In the first one.......the action of living has overed whereas in the second one it is still continue.
    that's precisely what I thought it used to mean.

  7. #7
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
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    Re: has lived vs has been living

    He has lived here for 5 years. Has lived means not living here anymore.

    He has been living here for 5 years. HAS BEEN LIVING means he is still living in the same place and it's been 5 years that he is there.

    They both mean that he has lived in that place for 5 years, maybe he is still living there, maybe not, maybe he's dead.

  8. #8
    jctgf is offline Key Member
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    Re: has lived vs has been living

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    He has lived here for 5 years. Has lived means not living here anymore.

    He has been living here for 5 years. HAS BEEN LIVING means he is still living in the same place and it's been 5 years that he is there.

    They both mean that he has lived in that place for 5 years, maybe he is still living there, maybe not, maybe he's dead.
    hi,
    I wonder whether the sentences mean basically the same because of the verb (live) or because of "for 5 years".
    thanks.

  9. #9
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
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    Re: has lived vs has been living

    They are both saying the same thing, the first one with present perfect, the second with present perfect continuous. If it said 'He had lived here for 5 years', past perfect, it could mean that he no longer lived there, but not necessarily.

  10. #10
    jctgf is offline Key Member
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    Re: has lived vs has been living

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    They are both saying the same thing, the first one with present perfect, the second with present perfect continuous. If it said 'He had lived here for 5 years', past perfect, it could mean that he no longer lived there, but not necessarily.
    thanks.

    we are taught that the meaning of PP and PPC is precisely how Roselin explained.

    my doubt now is if the PP and the PPC mean always the same. if not, could you please provide a few examples?

    thanks.

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