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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
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    Default to or without to

    When i mention lots of topics, can I leave "to" out?
    Ex: There are many things people can do wrong when they bow.
    Bow too deeply
    Bow to the wrong person
    Not bow deeply enough
    * It was in a book, without "to" at the beginning.

    In other book, I saw:
    Aim: To practice asking and answering information questions. Why did they use "to" in this case.

    When should I use "to" and when i shouldn't?

    * I know that for imperative form, I just use the verb.

    Thank you.
    Last edited by Casiopea; 25-Nov-2004 at 09:28. Reason: email address removed

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
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    Default Re: to or without to

    Quote Originally Posted by Emanuelli
    When i mention lots of topics, can I leave "to" out?
    Ex: There are many things people can do wrong when they bow.
    Bow too deeply
    Bow to the wrong person
    Not bow deeply enough
    * It was in a book, without "to" at the beginning.

    In other book, I saw:
    Aim: To practice asking and answering information questions. Why did they use "to" in this case.

    When should I use "to" and when i shouldn't?

    * I know that for imperative form, I just use the verb.

    Thank you.
    'bow' is not an imperative in the following sentences; it's the main verb, and the subject has been omitted:

    (They) bow too deeply,
    (they) bow to the wrong person, (and)
    (they do) not bow deeply enough.

    'to bow' is a verb form called the to-infinitive. If 'to' is omitted at the head of the sentence, then it renders the verb bare; that is, it renders it an imperative:

    EX: To practice answering. (to-infintive)
    EX: Practice asnwering. (Imperative, command)

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