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    #1

    hitch = problem or setback?

    Please help me with the two following multiple-choice questions. The task is to choose the word that is closest in meaning to each underlined word.
    1. The furnace in the factory was turned up as high as possible.
    A.Temperature B.oven D.kiln
    Could a furnace be an oven? Though I usually hear about an oven as a kitchen appliance but I think a furnace could be a special kind of oven

    2. There was a hitch in the program, which caused a two-hour delay.
    A.problem B.setback
    I feel that both choices are acceptable but setback may be the best choice because it refers to delay. But my teacher chose A.

  1. Soup's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: hitch = problem or setback?

    My choices:
    1. The furnace in the factory was turned up as high as possible.

    A. temperature
    B. oven
    D. kiln
    2. There was a hitch in the program, which caused a two-hour delay.

    A. problem
    B. setback


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    #3

    Re: hitch = problem or setback?

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    My choices:
    1. The furnace in the factory was turned up as high as possible.

    A. temperature
    B. oven
    D. kiln
    Oh, I forgot to consider "temperature". Ah, I've got it, turning up is an action to increase the temperature and increasing an oven or a kiln doesn't make sense. Right?

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    #4

    Re: hitch = problem or setback?

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    My choices:
    1. The furnace in the factory was turned up as high as possible.

    A. temperature
    B. oven
    D. kiln
    2. There was a hitch in the program, which caused a two-hour delay.

    A. problem
    B. setback
    Are you sure about that soup? I would have chosen oven or kiln for n1 although it's not very clear because a kiln is a kind of industrial/craft oven, and problem for n2.

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: hitch = problem or setback?

    Quote Originally Posted by linhtho0211 View Post
    [/indent]Oh, I forgot to consider "temperature". Ah, I've got it, turning up is an action to increase the temperature and increasing an oven or a kiln doesn't make sense. Right?
    You can turn up an oven or a kiln they usually have thermostats which can be set at different temperatures.


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    #6

    Re: hitch = problem or setback?

    Ooh, so it's getting more difficult. If turning up an oven or a kiln is okay then, which could replace "furnace"?
    And, what makes you choose problem for number 2?

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    #7

    Re: hitch = problem or setback?

    Quote Originally Posted by linhtho0211 View Post
    Ooh, so it's getting more difficult. If turning up an oven or a kiln is okay then, which could replace "furnace"?
    And, what makes you choose problem for number 2?
    It's difficult to choose between oven and kiln because a kiln is a kind of oven for industrial use, ceramics etc. I would go for kiln because we are talking about a factory.
    For n2, it's more a gut feeling than anything else, to me it feels more natural with 'two hour delay.'

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    #8

    Re: hitch = problem or setback?

    I’m not a teacher.

    Hi lintho0211,

    I share the bhaisahab’s opinion.

    A furnace is a device used for heating. The name derives from Latin fornax, oven.

    In British English the term furnace is used exclusively to mean industrial furnaces which are used for many things, such as the extraction of metal from ore (smelting) or in oil refineries and other chemical plants, for example as the heat source for fractional distillation columns.

    turn up = increase the volume, speed, intensity

    To turn up the volume of the furnace in order to increase the temperature…
    If one wishes to maintain a temperature of 20 degrees, then one might set the thermostat to turn the furnace on when the temperature drops..

    Regards,

    V.

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    #9

    Re: hitch = problem or setback?

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Are you sure about that soup? I would have chosen oven or kiln for n1 although it's not very clear because a kiln is a kind of industrial/craft oven, and problem for n2.
    Yup.

    What if the factory bakes food (e.g., bread, pizza, etc) or, as you mentioned, makes ceramics?

    You see, both oven and kiln work, which is problematic. Consider how speakers use language today, however, and while turning the "temperature" up higher' would have been odd sematics in the days of old, today it's perfectly usable English.

    'Setback' means delay.


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    #10

    Re: hitch = problem or setback?

    Hi lintho0211,

    You might see alone the cranky sentence that turned out as a result of the replacement of “temperature” for “furnace”.


      1. The temperature in the factory was turned up as high as possible.


    I would agree with Soup that the term in question could be “temperature” but only if you make another change in the present sentence namely in the place of “factory” you have to write “sweating-bath” or “sauna”.

    1.1. The temperature in the sauna was turned up as high as possible.

    setback = problems, often in business or manufacturing, that result in lower profits or a delay in realizing a certain event.

    1.There was a hitch in the program, which caused a two-hour delay. (the original sentence)

    2.There was a delay in the program which caused a two-hour delay.(“’Setback' means delay”, according to theSoup’s opinion)

    3.There was a problem in the program which caused a two-hour delay. (according to the bhaisahab’s opinion)

    Setback may have the following meanings:

    • a problem
    • Setback (land use), the distance a structure must be from the edge of a lot
    • Setback (architecture), making upper storeys of a high-rise further back than the lower ones for aesthetic, structural, or land-use restriction

    There are a few synonyms of the word “hitch “: catch, check, delay, difficulty, drawback, hiccup, hindrance, hold-up, impediment, mishap, problem, snag, trouble.

    Regards,

    V.

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