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Thread: English Grammar

  1. #1
    dodo007 is offline Newbie
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    Default English Grammar

    Hi there

    Can you just check if I've understood these?

    If I say
    1. This is the level of blameworthiness that is appropriate for a crime. ''that is...crime'' relates to ''level''.

    2. He is the kind of player that we want to bring to the club. ''that we...club.'' relates to ''kind''.

    3. He is the sort of worker that will persevere.''that will persevere'' relates to ''sort''.

    Would it be the same if I replace ''that'' by ''who'' in (3) and by ''which'' in (2)?

    But for this one:

    The number of people who died in the accident has increased. I think ''who died in the accident'' relates to ''people''.

    Now:

    In ''degree of force used.'' ''used'' is for ''force'' or ''degree''. ''amount of money given.'' ''given'' describes to what? Same question for ''owed'' in ''duty of care owed''

    Please help with these.

    My kind regards

    Dodo

  2. #2
    abaka is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: English Grammar

    Would it be the same if I replace ''that'' by ''who'' in (3) and by ''which'' in (2)?

    In practice, definitely yes. But some strict users of the language believe that you must not, because these clauses are implicitly "restrictive".


    The number of people who died in the accident has increased. I think ''who died in the accident'' relates to ''people''.

    Yes. And, again, some believe you MUST say "that" here.

    In ''degree of force used.'' ''used'' is for ''force'' or ''degree''. ''amount of money given.'' ''given'' describes to what? Same question for ''owed'' in ''duty of care owed''

    You know, in practice the participle applies to the "X of Y" clause. And so one could insist the participle applies to X or to Y but if the meaning cannot be clearly distinguished, what does it matter? --Unless, that is, you have a teacher who has a very definite point of view. In which case you should ask your teacher and, for the purposes of the class, follow the advice!

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