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Thread: Please correct

  1. #41
    RonBee's Avatar
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    Default Re: Please correct

    Quote Originally Posted by ram
    Dear Ronbee,
    It's back to school again. I have been having problems with identifying simple subjects and predicates in sentences with subordinate and independent clauses.
    For example
    1.Makati parking fees were raised by 30% and this figure was much higher than Ayala's.
    my answers are fees and figure---simple subjets, were raised and was---simple predicate.
    Fees and figure are indeed the simple subjects of those clauses. If by simple predicate is meant the verb minus the rest of the predicate then I agree with your answer.
    Quote Originally Posted by ram
    2. An outlawed group who claims to be fighting for a worthy cause is involved in illegal acts.
    group--subject, is involved---predicate. How about who and claims?
    The simple subject is group. The full subject is An outlawed group who claims to be fighting for a worthy cause.


    Quote Originally Posted by ram
    3.2002 is the year of the horse and this symbolizes the jumpstart of progress
    2002/this---subjects, is/symbolizes---predicate
    Yep.

    Quote Originally Posted by ram
    4.Corruption in the country seems to be so pervasive that even if you are a righteous individual, you will sometimes be corrupted.
    corruption--subject. how about the YOU's? seems (or is it seems to be?)---predicate, How about are and will?
    simple subject, main clause: corruption; "simple predicate": seems to be. The yous are the simple subjects of the subordinate clauses.


    Quote Originally Posted by ram
    5. Is there hope for a country if many of its leaders are wallowing in dirty politics?
    Hope---subject. how about leaders? is--predicate, how about are wallowing?
    The simple subject of the subordinate clause is many.


  2. #42
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    Default Re: Please correct

    Here's a question. Are food and drink count or noncount nouns? (You can find the answers right here on this forum. Use the "Search" function.)



  3. #43
    Steven D's Avatar
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    Default Re: Please correct

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    I think your English is quite good, but I do have a suggestion. The word hope is always about the future. Thus, you can say I hope we get a native English speaker to come to our house, but you can't say I hope we have a native English speaker at our house. You can't hope you have something. (Even when the sentence in question concerns a past event ("I hope you did well") the word hope is still about the future in that it is about expectations.)


    The word hope is always about the future. <<<<

    Always? I would say it's also about current or present expectations that are desirable.

    We hope they're having a good time. - That means now.

    I hope there's some food in the fridge. I'm hungry. - That means "food in the fridge" now.
    ______________________________________

    (Even when the sentence in question concerns a past event ("I hope you did well") the word hope is still about the future in that it is about expectations.) <<<<

    However, the results have already been achieved. It's about one's expectations, but not about whether the expectations are to be fulfilled in the future. One will find out, but the events that produced the result have already taken place - in the past.

    ________________________________________
    You can't hope you have something. <<<

    I hope I have everything with me. - now - not in the future



    I hope I didn't forget anything.
    Last edited by Steven D; 07-Mar-2005 at 03:38.

  4. #44
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    Default Re: Please correct

    Quote Originally Posted by X Mode
    The word hope is always about the future. <<<<

    Always? I would say it's also about current or present expectations that are desirable.

    We hope they're having a good time. - That means now.

    I hope there's some food in the fridge. I'm hungry. - That means "food in the fridge" now.
    ______________________________________

    (Even when the sentence in question concerns a past event ("I hope you did well") the word hope is still about the future in that it is about expectations.) <<<<

    However, the results have already been achieved. It's about one's expectations, but not about whether the expectations are to be fulfilled in the future. One will find out, but the events that produced the result have already taken place - in the past.

    ________________________________________
    You can't hope you have something. <<<

    I hope I have everything with me. - now - not in the future



    I hope I didn't forget anything.
    Very good!


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