Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. guoguohu's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2007
    • Posts: 36
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    Transatlantic accent

    I am not a English native speaker. A couple of days ago, I was told by my friend, who is British, that I had picked up a transatlantic accent. To my understanding, this is some accent in the middle of the British accent and the American one.

    I am wondering if anyone has ever heard about this accent before. And is that a good thing to have?

    Any comments from English native speakers are very welcome. How do you like when you talk to someone holding such an accent?

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Jan 2009
    • Posts: 919
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: Transatlantic accent

    I'm not an expert on phonology at all, but I know such an accent, also called "mid-Atlantic English" exists or existed. Apparently it or something like it was used in the early days of Hollywood talkies.

    Mid-Atlantic English - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jan 2008
    • Posts: 2,944
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: Transatlantic accent

    I think he means you picked up a bit of an American accent.

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 46,363
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: Transatlantic accent

    One way the term can be used in the UK is for a British English speaker who uses some American sounds, the way many singers do.


    • Join Date: Feb 2010
    • Posts: 7
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5

    Re: Transatlantic accent

    It's a kind of neutral accent, which sounds halfway between British and American English. Mid-Atlantic English, also known as the trans-Atlantic accent, describes a cultivated or acquired version of the English language and does not represent the typical idiom of any location. ref: Neutralaccent.com Voices 24/7 | An accent the world understands


    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 576
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #6

    Re: Transatlantic accent

    I agree with Tdol and susiedqq. The actual Transatlantic English accent was popular in the mid-20th century. It is a very distinct accent if you hear it and isn't a real accent - that is, no one speaks it naturally. It is taught.

    So, your friend probably means that you are saying things both with British and American pronunciations.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,448
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #7

    Re: Transatlantic accent

    "Mid-Atlantic" I would understand to mean traces of both American and British usage/accent.

    "Trans-Atlantic" would indicate that an American pronunciation/accent is stronger.

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • German
      • Home Country:
      • Germany
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Nov 2008
    • Posts: 1,035
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #8

    Re: Transatlantic accent

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    "Mid-Atlantic" I would understand to mean traces of both American and British usage/accent.

    "Trans-Atlantic" would indicate that an American pronunciation/accent is stronger.

    But there are so many "American" regional accents. Someone from Boston sounds very different from someone from Texas, so what is an American accent?


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,448
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #9

    Re: Transatlantic accent

    To most people, a flat "a", slurring of consonants, different rhythm to the spoken word - particularly in terms of stresses. It is not necessary to look for specific accents, but to consider the overall difference in sound. To some an American accent is a richer sound than an English one.

Similar Threads

  1. Accent Description ???
    By j4mes_bond25 in forum Pronunciation and Phonetics
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 01-Apr-2010, 18:07
  2. accent training for ESL students
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-Jun-2008, 14:23
  3. Learning "plummy" accent ???
    By j4mes_bond25 in forum Pronunciation and Phonetics
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 07-Aug-2007, 07:34
  4. -less
    By Lenka in forum Pronunciation and Phonetics
    Replies: 48
    Last Post: 25-Oct-2006, 21:10

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •