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  1. #11
    sharolga is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: Russian borrowings in English

    Schi is a cabbage soup.

  2. #12
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    RonBee is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: Russian borrowings in English

    The word bistro is not considered foreign to most people. (Probably few are aware that it is from Russian.) Also, I know borscht from Borscht Belt (an area in New York*).

    Probably more than any other part of the country, New York** is a melting pot where words from various languages are absorbed and spread around.

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    *the state
    **the city

  3. #13
    SUDHKAMP's Avatar
    SUDHKAMP is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: Russian borrowings in English

    Meesha(the olympic game symbol, is often used in India, to refer Russians)

  4. #14
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: Russian borrowings in English

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaskin View Post
    hello,

    recently is known : oligarch
    (but it's come from Greek )

    Cheers,
    Yes, it does come from Greek, but its use in an economic/political sense - with a frisson of organized crime - is a strictly Russian thing. This often happens with borrowings - they take on a special meaning in the receiving country that doesn't have much connection with the original.

    For example, "footing" in English means something like "basis/foundation" - especially used in the phrase 'firm footing' ('Any new business, however small, needs to have a firm footing.' It can also, more concretely, refer to a person's foundation: 'The current was so strong that - although the water barely came up to my knees - I lost my footing.' But when it was borrowed into French it adopted the totally new meaning of 'jogging'.

    So I'd say that adding 'oligarch' to the list is fine.

    b

  5. #15
    Darijus is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: Russian borrowings in English

    There is another one - "Na zdorovye!"
    WARNING!!!
    Irresponsible actions followed by this phrase will surely cause a terrible hangover next morning.

  6. #16
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    Default Re: Russian borrowings in English

    Quote Originally Posted by Darijus View Post
    There is another one - "Na zdorovye!"
    WARNING!!!
    Irresponsible actions followed by this phrase will surely cause a terrible hangover next morning.
    LOL

    That looks almost the same as the Polish phrase: "Na zdrowie!" :D

  7. #17
    thod00 is offline Member
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    Default Re: Russian borrowings in English

    1 Babushka - I know it means grandmother, but most people would not.
    4 Bistro - Means a type of restaurant.
    5 Bolshevik - Often abbreviated to bolshy, to describe a trouble maker.
    6 Duma - I know it is the Russian parliament, most wouldn't know.
    7 Glasnost - The Russian reforms, but has no specific meaning to me.
    8 Gulag - Yes, the infamous Russian prisons. Means a harsh prison.
    11 Kremlin - The center of Russian rule (not the duma). Most think of St Basils? church with the ice cream cone towers.
    14 Perestroika - something like glasnost?
    15 Ruble (Rouble) - Russian money.
    16 Samovar - A type of old fashioned tea urn. Only find it in crossword puzzles.
    18 Soyuz - Russian version of the Apollo program.
    19 Sputnik - A Russian satellite
    20 Stalinism - A form of totalitarian rule where you kill everyone that disagrees.

  8. #18
    Clark is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: Russian borrowings in English

    Molotov cocktail - a bottle with petrol used as a grenade.

  9. #19
    SUDHKAMP's Avatar
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    Default Re: Russian borrowings in English

    Quote Originally Posted by Clark View Post
    Molotov cocktail - a bottle with petrol used as a grenade.
    Now a days it is called a Petrol bomb.

  10. #20
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: Russian borrowings in English

    Does "bistro" mean "quickly" in Russian, and is the first syllable stressed (making English borrowers 'mispronouce' the "o")?

    b

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