Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
  1. #1
    MARAMARA is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    55
    Post Thanks / Like

    Question Copula Verbs, adverbs and adjectives

    Hello, again. I´m wondering if anyone could say me is these sentences are right regarding to the useful Abaka´s and all of you explanations.
    That table looks heavy. (heavy=adj. modificando table- the table seems or is heavy) Insistently, he looked at the table.(insistently=adv. modificando look. Look funciona como verbo de acción)
    He spoke right(right=adv modificando speak) He looks right(right=adj mod. He. He seems or is right)
    The former children appear free regarding their behaviour (free=adj modificando children. The children seem or appear free). The children appeared suddenly in the back yard ( suddenly=adv modificando appear. To appear como verbo de acción)
    And : Why a test that I´ve taken, checks this choice like wrong, answering beautfully like the right one.
    The tomato plants grew quickly in the rich soil. Mrs. Ficara intended to use the homegrown tomatoes to make her beautiful tempting lasagna.
    Thanks in advance

  2. #2
    abaka is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    919
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Copula Verbs, adverbs and adjectives

    That table looks heavy. Adjective. Correct!

    Insistently, he looked at the table. Adverb.
    This is grammatically correct, but I'm not so sure about the meaning. If you mean he looked on the table "emphatically, resolutely, firmly", the adverb you want is "intently". Despite the primary meaning of "to insist", "insistently" sounds strange here.

    He spoke right. Adverb. Dubious. "Right" as an adverb meaning "correctly" is informal. Common phrase, but some would call it illiterate and insist on "he spoke correctly".

    He looks right. Adjective. Correct! But beware: the sentence can also mean "he looks to the right" (direction opposite to "left"; and "right" is an adverb).

    The former children appear free regarding their behaviour. The adjective is grammatically correct, but "regarding their behaviour" is not idiomatic. "Appear" is correct, but it is very formal: "seem" may be better.
    [And "former" makes sense in two cases: (1) you have already defined two categories of children; (2) you are speaking of adolescents or adults.]



    The possibilities are:
    • The former children seem free in their behaviour.
    • The former children's behaviour seems free.
    The children appeared suddenly in the back yard. Adverb. Correct!



    Beautiful or beautifully. The choice depends on what is beautiful: the temptation, for which an adverb should modify the adjective, or the lasagna, in which case a comma clarifies the meaning:
    • Mrs. Ficara intended to use the homegrown tomatoes to make her beautifully tempting lasagna.
    • Mrs. Ficara intended to use the homegrown tomatoes to make her beautiful, tempting lasagna.
    You have analysed the grammar correctly, by and large. But as you can see, the choice of words is very important!

  3. #3
    hela is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Tunisia
      • Current Location:
      • Tunisia
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,180
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Copula Verbs, adverbs and adjectives

    Hello abaka,

    What is meant by "He looks right" ? (not talking about the direction)

    See you

  4. #4
    abaka is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    919
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Copula Verbs, adverbs and adjectives

    He seems right. Since propriety is an abstract concept, and "look" as a copula is best left for physical appearance, "seems" is better here.

  5. #5
    hela is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Tunisia
      • Current Location:
      • Tunisia
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,180
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Copula Verbs, adverbs and adjectives

    "He seems right" = what he says seems to be right ?
    All the best

  6. #6
    abaka is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    919
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Copula Verbs, adverbs and adjectives

    Yes, or also "he seems to be the right person for the task".

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    21
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Copula Verbs, adverbs and adjectives


  8. #8
    MARAMARA is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    55
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Copula Verbs, adverbs and adjectives

    Thank you Abaka. This is my great problem, as you have said: the words choice.I have asked for an answer a large number of times,but nobody answers this question: How could I recognise the more common and daily expressions, the correct usage of the English language.? Do you have any advice? What should I do? When I read your corrections, they seem so clear and easy, but when I have to write something, I tend to make great mistakes with the intention to write( or to speak) well.
    Your answers have been, like always, clear and appropiate.
    All the best.

  9. #9
    abaka is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    919
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Copula Verbs, adverbs and adjectives

    That is the great problem. Some suggestions:
    • If you know any native speakers of English, spend as much time with them as possible and pay attention to the way they speak. Unless you really don't understand them, however, or they are specially trained in English, don't ask for too many explanations.
    • Watch anglophone TV if you can, listen to the radio. Movies, entertainment of all sorts is an excellent way to learn slang and very colloquial or informal language, but be careful: the way the characters talk is usually quite unsuitable for formal writing. Newscasts are a fairly good way to pick up the neutral language, but be careful you don't learn too many cliches.
    • Read. One absolutely proven way to pick up a very neutral, plain, good style of English, suitable for both speech and writing, is to read Agatha Christie, P.D. James, Rex Stout, and Erle Stanley Gardner. These are all detective stories. Iain Banks or Isaac Asimov if you like science fiction, for the language. Modern paragons of more serious style include (among my favourites) George Orwell, Daphne Du Maurier, Sinclair Lewis, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway. Note they are all mid-century. I recommend them deliberately because their style is by now considered extremely standard, neutral.
    • When you write, either borrow your short phrases from trusted authors you've already read, or do a Google search for every expression. See if it appears in blogs, newspapers, academic articles. If it does, in all three, you know you have hit on the universal plain English. For any three or four word phrase, the minimum number of hits should be no less than 10,000. 100,000 is better. Be very careful if the phrase appears only in blogs and music lyrics, or in newspapers as a direct quotation. For the purposes of checking your language, ignore online forums altogether.
    • Try as much as possible not to translate your thoughts into English, but to think in English. If you must look up something in a Spanish/English dictionary, make sure it's no more than a single word, and never one of the basic connectives. Do NOT translate metaphors, idioms, quaint expressions. If you have a thought in Spanish you'd like to express in English, make sure that the Spanish is direct and has no deep, implied meaning. Learn to check English words in an English dictionary, not a bilingual one, even if at first you must translate the English definitions back into Spanish. I say "learn" because in my experience with ESL students this is the hardest habit to gain effectively, and the best possible habit to learn.
    • Lastly: keep your English as simple as possible. If you can, write everything in simple sentences at first, then combine them with the necessary conjunctions (if, because, then, when, as, and, but and so on), or even with basic punctuation. Keep all verbs active. Do not fall into the trap of combining multiple nouns or adjectives with prepositions. Remember that to write is to communicate a thought clearly; but to show off your vocabulary, grammar, or style is pretentious and tasteless.
    • And never be discouraged! If the thought is good, a poor sentence is better than no sentence at all.
    Last edited by abaka; 03-Feb-2009 at 20:45. Reason: added a couple of others

  10. #10
    MARAMARA is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    55
    Post Thanks / Like

    Thumbs up Re: Copula Verbs, adverbs and adjectives

    Dear Abaka,
    Thank you!!!!!!!!!! You are great. I´m going to keep your advices in a folder of my browser to read them frequently.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Adverbs vs. adjectives
    By NinaRasmussen in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 08-Aug-2008, 17:15
  2. adverbs and adjectives
    By Fairywoo in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 29-Oct-2007, 11:55
  3. Adjectives That Look Like Adverbs
    By Merlosa in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 05-Oct-2007, 17:22
  4. Trouble with adjectives and adverbs :S
    By THE_GREAT_ARES in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 18-Jun-2007, 14:30
  5. Adjectives and Adverbs
    By ber1423 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-Jan-2007, 22:49

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •