Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    phoenixqn81 is offline Junior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Vietnamese
      • Home Country:
      • Vietnam
      • Current Location:
      • Vietnam
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    74
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default escaped unharmed or escaped unharmedly

    Please help me whether "escaped unharmed" or "escaped unharmedly" is wright. I do an excercise in a test book:

    All of the people in the building escaped from the fire ...............
    a. harmless b. harmlessly c. unharmed d. unharmedly

    and the answer is "unharmed".

    I think after "escaped" we must need an adverb but when checking in the dictionary, I don't see the word "unharmedly". So please expalin me this issue.

    Thanks in advance.

    Phoenix

  2. #2
    abaka is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    919
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: escaped unharmed or escaped unharmedly

    The people were unharmed. The fire, on the other hand, presumably caused a lot of other damage or harm. So "harmless" or harmlessly" cannot be used: they mean "without causing harm", adjectivally or adverbially.

    Here "escaped" is a copula verb, grammatically, and "unharmed" is a predicate adjective acting as subjective complement. Or perhaps some other structure can be devised to explain this sentence. But in the end it's a common idiom, based on the logic above.

  3. #3
    phoenixqn81 is offline Junior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Vietnamese
      • Home Country:
      • Vietnam
      • Current Location:
      • Vietnam
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    74
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: escaped unharmed or escaped unharmedly

    Thank you very much. And I want to ask you that if we have the word "unharmedly" or not.

    For example: We reached home unharmedly.
    or we just say: We reached home unharmed.

    Thanks

  4. #4
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    22,730
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: escaped unharmed or escaped unharmedly

    Quote Originally Posted by phoenixqn81 View Post
    Thank you very much. And I want to ask you that if we have the word "unharmedly" or not.

    For example: We reached home unharmedly.
    or we just say: We reached home unharmed.

    Thanks
    'Unharmedly' is not a word, or if it is, I have never seen it in more than 50 years of speaking and reading English.

  5. #5
    phoenixqn81 is offline Junior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Vietnamese
      • Home Country:
      • Vietnam
      • Current Location:
      • Vietnam
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    74
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: escaped unharmed or escaped unharmedly

    , so in every case, I'll use "unharmed".

    It's very kind of you for helping me.

  6. #6
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    15,650
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: escaped unharmed or escaped unharmedly

    Quote Originally Posted by phoenixqn81 View Post
    , so in every case, I'll use "unharmed".

    It's very kind of you for helping me.
    Options would be 'unscathed'* (maybe only Br English), or an adjectival phrase such as 'without being injured'. If you are injured but you can walk we still use the old war-time category 'the walking wounded'. And if someone's totally untouched, s/he emerges 'without a hair out of place'. (Sorry if this is too much info.)

    b

    *PS Don't go looking for the positive: 'scathed' - like 'kempt' and 'gruntled' - hasn't been used commonly for centuries.
    Last edited by BobK; 04-Feb-2009 at 12:21. Reason: Added PS

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •