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  1. #1
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    Arrow MA thesis on neologism translation

    Hey, I am to write my MA thesis at university on translation of neologisms in the novel A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess. I will compare two Polish translations published by the same translator. What I need is some feedback about connotations that come to minds of native speakers of English when encountering neologisms found in the book. Basically, what I need is a list of words, ideas that you have on seeing a word like "devotchka" - whether they are pleasant or not, whether you find the term offensive, colloquial, funny, weird, whatever.

    I'll be VERY grateful for your feedback. Please write me a private message if you're interested in contributing to my MA project. I can send you the form via e-mail or in a private message reply.

    Thanks very much in advance. Please let me know if you're interested.

  2. #2
    thod00 is offline Member
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    Re: MA thesis on neologism translation

    'Devotchka' sounds Russian to my ears, but it doesnt evoke any image in my mind. I just looked it up on Nadsat dictionary, wouldnt have guessed that.

  3. #3
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: MA thesis on neologism translation

    Words like bog & rot worked well IMO because of the association with both languages.

  4. #4
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    Re: MA thesis on neologism translation

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    Words like bog & rot worked well IMO because of the association with both languages.
    Perhaps, but I should believe that most native speakers would have definitely unpleasant feelings about words "bog" (meaning in English also: "marsh" or "toilet") and "rot" (similar to the verbs: "to decay", "to deteriorate").

  5. #5
    ann_q is offline Newbie
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    Re: MA thesis on neologism translation

    You chose an interesting subject! So did I, honestly:) I'm also writing my MA about translation of A Clockwork Orange (into Polish and Russian) and I'm almost finishing my thesis. If you still have any problems, contact me and I'll do my best

  6. #6
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: MA thesis on neologism translation

    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy_Q View Post
    Perhaps, but I should believe that most native speakers would have definitely unpleasant feelings about words "bog" (meaning in English also: "marsh" or "toilet") and "rot" (similar to the verbs: "to decay", "to deteriorate").

    I am not sure they're that disturbing, but it was nice to see them being used in the book because they carried some of the English meanings over with them.

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