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  1. #1
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    sentence structure question

    Using a dictionary I got all the possible types of each word for the sentence below. I also gave a reason why that structure is not correct for that sentence. But when trying all the possibilites for this sentence I am not left with just one possibility. Can you explain why the ones with a "?" can not be
    correct for the sentence below:

    The old walk home.

    1. determiner adjective verb noun
    2. determiner adjective verb adverb
    3. determiner adjective verb adjective
    4. determiner adjective verb verb
    5. determiner adjective noun noun
    6. determiner adjective noun adverb
    7. determiner adjective noun verb
    8. determiner adjective noun adjective
    9. determiner noun verb noun
    10. determiner noun verb adverb
    11. determiner noun verb adjective
    12. determiner noun verb verb
    13. determiner noun noun noun
    14. determiner noun noun adverb
    15. determiner noun noun adjective
    16. determiner noun noun verb

    reasons given for each case:

    1. can not occur since a adjective/verb combination can not exist.
    2. can not occur since a adjective/verb combination can not exist.
    3. can not occur since a adjective/verb combination can not exist.
    4. can not occur since a adjective/verb combination can not exist.
    5. ?
    6. ?
    7. ?
    8. can only occur for certain noun/adjective combinations, not in this case
    9. ?
    10. ?.
    11. can only occur if verb is a linking verb, not in the case
    12. can only occur if first verb is a auxiliary verb, not in this case
    13. ?
    14. ?
    15. can only occur for certain noun/adjective combinations, not in this case
    16. ?

    Thank you for your help.

  2. #2
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    Re: sentence structure question

    Are they phrases in isolation or are they phrases that make up a sentence? If the former, then I agree with your list, but if the latter, well, there's a great deal of variation to consider, so a list of examples would be more than helpful.

  3. #3
    notmyname216 is offline Junior Member
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    Re: sentence structure question

    Casiopea, I am sure what is being asked is for a phrase that makes up that sentence, as a complete sentence. That being the case, why are the ones that have a reason given as "?" not the correct structure for that sentence?

    Would this be the correct reason for some of them:

    5. no verb exists in the sentence.
    6. no verb exists in the sentence.
    7. ?
    9. ?
    10. ?
    13. no verb exists in the sentence.
    14. no verb exists in the sentence.
    16. ?

  4. #4
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    Re: sentence structure question

    Thank you, notmyname216, and welcome.

    Can you explain why the ones with "?" can not be
    correct for the sentence: The old walk home.
    Sorry. I did not see your example sentence.

    Here are my reasons:

    5. determiner adjective noun noun
    Two consecutive nouns that (a) do not form a compound and (b) are not joined by a conjunction. In terms of syntax, 'noun noun' should be listed as 'noun'; i.e., a compound, but that would result in walkhome, which is not an English word. 5. is not OK.

    6. determiner adjective noun adverb
    If we expand our example sentence The old walk home to The old walk that leads home, a relative clause modifying the noun 'walk', then 'home', even though it's a noun in form and an adverb in function within the relative clause, it functions as an adjective because it represents an adjectival clause that has been partially omitted. On the other hand, if we expand The old walk home to The old walk (leads) home, a linking structure, then 'home' in answering the question Where? functions as an adverb, so 6. is OK iff interpreted as a linking structure, one in which the linking element has been omitted. Otherwise, 6. is not OK.

    (Please note, Adverbs of Place can indeed function as the predicate of a linking structure. The reason being, they are nominal in form; i.e., prepositions and nouns.)

    7. determiner adjective noun verb
    If 'home' were a verb it would require an object; e.g., The missile named, 'old walk' homed in on the target. 7. is not OK.

    9. determiner noun verb noun
    'old' is an adjective in form, but it functions as a substantive noun; e.g., The old (i.e., the seniors) walk home (everyday at 5:00), so 'old' can be a noun. That is, the first part of 9. determiner noun verb is OK. It's the last part, the noun, that the problem. 'home' answers the question Where?, so it functions as an adverb; e.g., Where did the old walk?, as in 10. below, but 9. is not OK.

    10. determiner noun verb adverb
    The old (i.e., the seniors) walk home. 10. is OK.

    13. determiner noun noun noun
    Again, way too many nouns. Functionally, the first noun could be listed as an adjective and the last two nouns as a compound, giving the structure:

    13a. determiner adjective compound noun (The old walkhome)

    but 'walkhome' is not a word, so 13a. is not possible. We could try re-structuring the nouns, wherein 'oldwalk' describes what kind of home

    13b. determiner adjective noun (The oldwalk home)

    but then again 'an oldwalk home' is not English either. So structurally, 13b. is not possible.

    14. determiner noun noun adverb
    Aside from the double nouns, there the problem of the adverb. Adverbs, note the prefix ad-, add to the meaning of adjectives and verbs. In 14. there is neither an adjective nor a verb for the adverb to pass its meaning onto, so the structure is faulty. 14. is not OK.

    16. determiner noun noun verb
    As a verb, 'home' is transitive, so it needs an object to realize its meaning. 16. is not OK.

  5. #5
    ritzven is offline Newbie
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    Re: sentence structure question

    Mr.Laxman is having lunch.
    Mr.Laxman is having his lunch
    which of the above statements is correct or are both the statements correct

  6. #6
    Teia is offline Key Member
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    Re: sentence structure question

    Quote Originally Posted by ritzven View Post
    Mr.Laxman is having lunch.
    Mr.Laxman is having his lunch
    which of the above statements is correct or are both the statements correct
    In my opinion, the first sentence is correct. It`s not necessary adding "his".

  7. #7
    edwinghansen is offline Newbie
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    Re: sentence structure question

    Hi,
    I am not sure I understand what is being asked. But you have nominated " The old walk home", as a sentence, therefore it has a subject and a predicate, which of course must include a verb. So initially the sentence needs analysing. I see the subject as 'The old' the verb as 'walk' and 'home' as the adverbial clause of place. The next step is then to dissect the analysied sentence into parts of speech. Determiner, noun, verb, (to) noun.
    If "The old walk home" is not a sentence then it is a collection of words and every part of speech that can be attributed to each single word is the correct answer. ie if "old' is an adjective to the noun "walk" then we do not have a sentence, as you nominated in your introduction.
    Very interesting
    edwin.

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