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  1. #1
    vil is offline VIP Member
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    Default a pun = an expression in which two different applications of a word present an odd or

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my allegation that the following excerpt from a conversation contains two puns at the least?

    “Can you see a female?”
    “Of course I can see a female as easily as a male. Do you suppose I’m blind?”

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.

  2. #2
    thod00 is offline Member
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    Default Re: a pun = an expression in which two different applications of a word present an od

    Not really a pun though.

    Consider the hackneyed pick up line "If I said you had a beautiful body would you hold it against me?".

    To hold something against another is to bear a grudge. So he could be asking her if she minded him commenting on her body. An alternative is that he is asking her to press her body to his.

    She cant tell his meaning, and he hopes to get her to laugh with his witty line and thus gain her favor.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: a pun = an expression in which two different applications of a word present an od

    NOTE:
    allegation: a claim or assertion that someone has done something illegal or wrong, typically one made without proof

    compare

    contention: an assertion, especially one maintained in presenting an argument for debate or discussion

  4. #4
    vil is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: a pun = an expression in which two different applications of a word present an od

    Hi David L.

    Thank you for your benevolent rectification. Usually I am ready for making a careful note of every fair criticizm. In the present case I cannot accept your note as one which is to the point. I know I make many mistakes in my work concerning with the absorbtion of the difficult to master English language. In the present practical example I made use of the term “allegation” with set purpose. You have to know that for me “allegetaion” means “ unfounded, groundless, baseless, unsubstantiated statement”.

    There are a few synonyms of “allegation”: accusation, affirmation, assertion, charge, claim, declaration, plea, statement, testimony.

    There are also a few synonyms of the term “contention” which I am well versed in the subject: affirmation, allegation, argument, assertion, belief, alaim, competition, contest, controversy, debate, declaration, discord, dispute, dissension, idea, opinion, position, stand, strive, thesis, view.

    In conclusion, in my original post, I was not confident of my statement, so I used the term “allegation” but in the next post you will see my “contention”.

    Thank you again for your backing.

    Regards,

    V.

  5. #5
    vil is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: a pun = an expression in which two different applications of a word present an od

    Hi thod00,

    Thank you for your reply as well as for your exotic pun.

    And now you have to see my popular persuasion in the form of a contetion.

    There are two puns in the following excerpt from a conversation at least:

    “Can you see a female?”
    “Of course I can see as easily as a male. Do you suppose I’m blind!”

    The verb “see” is used in the first sentence in the meaning of “to admit or receive, as for consultation or a social visit: The doctor will see you now”, in the second – “To perceive with the eye”.

    In the question the modal verb “can” express possibility (=Is it possible for you to see…?)= (Are you not busy?). In the answer the verb “can” is used in the meaning of physical ability.

    Thus the pun is based on the two meanings of the verb “can” , as well as on the two meaning of the verb “to see”.

    Regards,

    V.

  6. #6
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: a pun = an expression in which two different applications of a word present an od

    Hi Vil,
    The two uses of 'can' are so close that there's no difference here. There are not two puns in the exchange.

    It might work a bit better in a context where we usually use "see," as in a doctor's office as you described. That meaning never occurred to me until you mentioned it.

    Nurse: Doctor, can you see Mr. Smith now?
    Doctor: Now that you've fetched my glasses for me, I can.

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