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    #1

    like to lie in vs like lying in

    Hi again,

    I'm wondering if I can say:

    1. I like lying in till late hours.
    2. I like to lay in till late hours.

    As far as I know, after verbs like "like" another verb has to have the -ing form, but the second sentence doesn't sound bad...

    What do you think?

    Thanks,

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: like to lie in vs like lying in

    It should be "lie" not "lay.

    You can use either form.

    A: What form of exercise do you enjoy?
    B: I Like to swim/I like swimming.

    A: What's the best part of your weekends?
    B: I like to relax with a good book/I like relaxing with a good book.

  2. buggles's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: like to lie in vs like lying in

    Quote Originally Posted by forum_mail View Post
    Hi again,

    I'm wondering if I can say:

    1. I like lying in till late hours.
    2. I like to lay in till late hours.

    As far as I know, after verbs like "like" another verb has to have the -ing form, but the second sentence doesn't sound bad...

    What do you think?

    Thanks,
    With a little tweaking, you can use either.


    1. I like lying in till late morning. (or ...late in the morning.)
    2. I like to lie in till late morning.

    Either sounds fine to a native speaker.

    buggles (not a teacher)

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    #4

    Re: like to lie in vs like lying in

    To most North Americans, "lie in" would be confusing. They would ask "Lie in where or what???"
    We say "I like to sleep in" or "I like to stay in bed late."

    I am not a teacher.


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    #5

    Re: like to lie in vs like lying in

    So, the difference between : Like to V & like V-ng:
    as i know, Like to V : want to verb
    like V-ng : enjoy V-ng
    Is it fine?
    thanks


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    #6

    Re: like to lie in vs like lying in

    Quote Originally Posted by Vu Hien View Post
    So, the difference between : Like to V & like V-ng:
    as i know, Like to V : want to verb
    like V-ng : enjoy V-ng
    Is it fine?
    thanks
    Strictly speaking, there is no notion of enjoyment with like to + infinitive. It implies that you prefer to do something rather than something else: I like to put the breakfast things on the table in the evening so I don't have to spend too much time getting breakfast ready in the morning.

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    #7

    Re: like to lie in vs like lying in

    Quote Originally Posted by Vu Hien View Post
    So, the difference between : Like to V & like V-ng:
    as i know, Like to V : want to verb
    like V-ng : enjoy V-ng
    Is it fine?
    thanks
    Like to/like + -ing
    In British English, there is usually a difference; we use it when there are restrictions or limits:
    He like to read when he is on holiday. )(= he doesn't like it as much when he is not on holiday)

    In American English, from what I've read in similar discussions, there is little difference.


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    #8

    Re: like to lie in vs like lying in

    I think the different meanings of lie and lay were confused in the posts above.

    This following pun my help clarify the different meanings of the two words:

    "An ambassador is an honest man, sent to lie abroad for the good of his country."

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    #9

    Re: like to lie in vs like lying in

    Quote Originally Posted by Baffled View Post
    I think the different meanings of lie and lay were confused in the posts above.
    To lie in bed, means to recline in the bed. To lay, means to place, as in I lay my clothes on the bed.

    This following pun my help clarify the different meanings of the two words:

    "An ambassador is an honest man, sent to lie abroad for the good of his country." In this case, is the ambassador now telling an untruth, or is he going to lie (recline) in bed.?
    I am not a teacher.


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    #10

    Re: like to lie in vs like lying in

    I guess that's why a pun is a pun!

    I'm not a teacher, just a punster.

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