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Thread: vocabulary

  1. #1
    Dany's Avatar
    Dany is offline Senior Member
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    Default vocabulary

    Hello everyone.

    Can some explain me the using or the difference of the folling (underlined) words?

    He has to appear as a witness.
    He has to appear as a voucher.
    He has to appear as an attestor.
    He has to appear as an evidence.
    Thanks in advance
    Dany

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    Default Re: vocabulary

    Quote Originally Posted by Dany
    Hello everyone.

    Can some explain me the using or the difference of the folling (underlined) words?

    He has to appear as a witness.
    He has to appear as a voucher.
    He has to appear as an attestor.
    He has to appear as an evidence.
    Thanks in advance
    Dany
    'witness' is correct.

  3. #3
    Dany's Avatar
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    Default Re: vocabulary

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    'witness' is correct.
    Thanks a lot for your fast answer.

    Why can't I use the other words? What's the difference between them?

  4. #4
    AintFoolin Guest

    Default Re: vocabulary

    in this meaning, vouch and attest are only ever used as verbs ("I can vouch for his presence last night" "I can attest to his honesty"). The noun form might be technically ok, but no one ever uses them.

    'An evidence' is never correct in this scenario. Normally you refer to an item OF evidence. In this case, you could say "He has to appear as evidence", which would imply they were more interested in something about his body like a wound or scar than what he actually had to say. 'An evidence' can be correctly used like this: "Falling is an evidence of gravity"

  5. #5
    Dany's Avatar
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    Default Re: vocabulary

    Quote Originally Posted by AintFoolin
    in this meaning, vouch and attest are only ever used as verbs ("I can vouch for his presence last night" "I can attest to his honesty"). The noun form might be technically ok, but no one ever uses them.

    'An evidence' is never correct in this scenario. Normally you refer to an item OF evidence. In this case, you could say "He has to appear as evidence", which would imply they were more interested in something about his body like a wound or scar than what he actually had to say. 'An evidence' can be correctly used like this: "Falling is an evidence of gravity"
    Thanks for your explanation. I think, I have understood it

    Kind regards,
    Dany

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