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  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #11
    Quote Originally Posted by gwendolinest
    Yes, I was sure I had heard the word “costed” before. But it’s not in my dictionaries.

    (:?)
    Here is an entry from Webster's Third (unabridged):

    Main Entry:3cost
    Pronunciation:*
    Function:verb
    Inflected Form:-ed/-ing/-s Etymology:probably from 1cost

    transitive verb : to estimate or figure on the cost of *some colleges try to cost menus before they use them College and University Business*
    intransitive verb : to estimate or figure on costs *standardize costing in an industry*

  2. gwendolinest
    Guest
    #12
    Hmm … I’m beginning to wonder if “costed” is more common in AE than in BE. The three dictionaries I looked up, which didn’t have that word, are all BE dictionaries.

    (:?)

  3. Anonymous
    Guest
    #13
    Quote Originally Posted by gwendolinest
    Hmm … I’m beginning to wonder if “costed” is more common in AE than in BE. The three dictionaries I looked up, which didn’t have that word, are all BE dictionaries.

    (:?)

    I'd say it's most likely an American invention.

    It does, however, appear in The Cambridge Dictionary of International English as well as The Cambridge Dictionary of American English. Of course, it also appears in Webster's Dictionary as a transitive verb with "costed" as the past tense. http://dictionary.cambridge.org/define.asp?key=cost*1+0

    cost
    verb [T]
    To cost something is to calculate its future cost.
    How carefully did you cost the materials for the new fence and gate?


    From Webster's Dictionary:

    2 : to require effort, suffering, or loss
    transitive senses
    1 : to have a price of
    2 : to cause to pay, suffer, or lose something <frequent absences cost him his job>
    3 past cost·ed : to estimate or set the cost of -- often used with out
    Has your scheme been properly costed (out)? [T/M]


    I always use OneLook if I need to be sure I'm getting the whole story. :P http://www.onelook.com/

    :)


    8)

  4. gwendolinest
    Guest
    #14
    Quote Originally Posted by TALKtown
    I always use OneLook if I need to be sure I'm getting the whole story. :P http://www.onelook.com/

    Then I’ll use OneLook as well next time!

    ()

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