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  1. #11
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    Default Re: 'looks' - is or are?

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    'a look' means a style or fashion - The Italian designers unveiled their latest look - ; and the general appearance of someone or something - The tramp had the characteristic disheveled look to him.

    'looks' specifically refers to a person's facial appearance considered aesthetically
    "I have many different looks"

    would refer to many different styles.
    the original post didn't really specify whether or not he was talking about looks in facial appearance or looks in style.

    I might also say "I like the look of your face"

    Though the dictionary doesn't really make a facial distinction and looks is often used to refer to the general appearance of something:
    looks definition | Dictionary.com
    15. the act of looking: a look of inquiry.
    16. a visual search or examination.
    17. the way in which a person or thing appears to the eye or to the mind; aspect: He has the look of an honest man. The tablecloth has a cheap look.
    18. an expressive glance: to give someone a sharp look.
    19. looks,
    a. general aspect; appearance: to like the looks of a place.
    b. attractive, pleasing appearance.
    Last edited by crossmr; 25-Feb-2009 at 13:28. Reason: added dictionary meaning

  2. #12
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    Default Re: 'looks' - is or are?

    crossmr :the original post didn't really specify whether or not he was talking about looks in facial appearance or looks in style.
    Hang on here. Let's not get things confused. Re-read the the first three posts, where this is clarified.

    The main thrust of this thread has been about verb agreement with 'looks'.

    Then the issue of 'look' and it's plural 'looks' arose, versus 'his good looks'.

    I might also say "I like the look of your face."
    Though the dictionary doesn't really make a facial distinction and looks is often used to refer to the general appearance of something:

    Yes - yes - in the same way I could say, "I like the look of your new haistyle." and "Brad Pitt's new looks" (referring to hairstyles/clothes/whatever).

    Let's not confuse this with 'my good looks' ='my handsomeness'

  3. #13
    Charlie Bernstein is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: 'looks' - is or are?

    Quote Originally Posted by philo2009 View Post
    'Looks' as a noun is only ever plural.
    I'm giving you a withering look.

    =O[

  4. #14
    Charlie Bernstein is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: 'looks' - is or are?

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    Can you give an example of 'looks' with 'is' as found on the Internet?
    As a teacher, I'm sure you can't mean, "Looks is deceiving", so I'm intrigued.
    Right. It's "Looks are deceiving" or "Her look was deceiving."

    I wish I could give you a text so you could take a look!

  5. #15
    Charlie Bernstein is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: 'looks' - is or are?

    Quote Originally Posted by solnadya View Post
    ' Which of Brad Pitt's newest looks is best? Not the mustache - people have been giving him strange looks.



    Gladiators - Looks Is Deceiving. Shoot the editor.

    [Sometimes I'm an editor, but not right now.]

  6. #16
    Charlie Bernstein is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: 'looks' - is or are?

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    'a look' means a style or fashion
    Yup. It can also be a meaningful glance: "My cat gave me such a look."

    Or an appraisal: "Let's give it a look." "When she was sure Brad couldn't see her, she took a long, careful look at him."

  7. #17
    Charlie Bernstein is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: 'looks' - is or are?

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    Hang on here. Let's not get things confused.
    For sure! I'm just driving a wooden stake into the heart of "'Looks' as a noun is only ever plural."

  8. #18
    philo2009 is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: 'looks' - is or are?

    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Bernstein View Post
    For sure! I'm just driving a wooden stake into the heart of "'Looks' as a noun is only ever plural."

    Quote Originally Posted by crossmr View Post
    it can be singular.
    "The movie star has a new look"
    Certainly true, but the enquiry concerned the grammatical number of the lexeme looks, which is a plural noun!
    Last edited by philo2009; 26-Feb-2009 at 06:16.

  9. #19
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    Default Re: 'looks' - is or are?

    Quote Originally Posted by philo2009 View Post
    Certainly true, but the enquiry concerned the grammatical number of the lexeme looks, which is a plural noun!
    Ah, but looks in the dictionary is only described as:
    a. general aspect; appearance: to like the looks of a place.
    b. attractive, pleasing appearance.
    and this can be used both singular and plural. If we're talking about general appearance.

    I like the look of his face - this is talking about the general appearance of his face.

  10. #20
    philo2009 is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: 'looks' - is or are?

    Quote Originally Posted by crossmr View Post
    Ah, but looks in the dictionary is only described as:


    and this can be used both singular and plural. If we're talking about general appearance.

    I like the look of his face - this is talking about the general appearance of his face.
    You're entirely missing the point of my response! Please take another look at your dictionary and you will, I believe, find that the word being defined is look (singular).

    The question that launched this woefully wandering thread, however - or so it transpired after some clarification - concerned, not the possible meanings of 'look(s)', but the grammatical number of the lexeme 'looks', i.e. it relates to the grammaticality or otherwise of e.g.

    *His looks is killing me.

    - a non-sentence, irrespective of which particular meaning of 'look(s)' you may care to ascribe to it!

    The verb 'looks', on the other hand, would be singular (3rd person, present indicative) and my original post aimed simply to clarify that the questioner's query did indeed relate to the noun, and not to the verb, form of this word.

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