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  1. #1
    Eureka is offline Junior Member
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    Smile Can you tell me the difference between "hear" and "hear about"?

    Hi, teachers

    These days, I'm so so~~~happy to get great answers from Excellent teachers. I mean it.

    Can you tell me the difference between "hear" and "hear about" with examples?


    I heard it from Mike.
    I heard about it from Mike.

    Do these examples mean the same thing?

    Thanks a trillion in advance.

  2. #2
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: Can you tell me the difference between "hear" and "hear about"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Eureka View Post
    Hi, teachers

    These days, I'm so so~~~happy to get great answers from Excellent teachers. I mean it.

    Can you tell me the difference between "hear" and "hear about" with examples?


    I heard it from Mike.
    I heard about it from Mike.

    Do these examples mean the same thing?

    Thanks a trillion in advance.
    Yes, they mean the same.

  3. #3
    Eureka is offline Junior Member
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    Smile Re: Can you tell me the difference between "hear" and "hear about"?

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Yes, they mean the same.
    Thank your for your answer. You said they mean same thing. Then how about this context?

    ex> I didn’t hear it but I heard about it.

    The reason why I asked about the difference between "hear" and "hear about" is because of the example above.

    Af first, I thought they mean same, but then I was confused after looing at the example. So I hope you check what I'm understood regarding them.

    In my opinion, when you directly hear something from someone's talking, you can use "hear" and when you hear about something from others, which means you were not involved in hearing it directly. Here are my examples:

    When the teacher told class about the test and I was there at the time then I can say "I heard the test coming up next week."

    but if I wasn't there and one of my friedns in class told me about the test, I can say
    "I heard about the test coming up next week."

    Of course, they mean same thing like other examples.
    ex> I heard it from Mike
    ex> I heard about it from Mike.


    However, I think this applies to the occasion which focuses on the result of "I already know it from hearing" regardless of direct hearing("use of hear") or indirect hearing activities(use of "hear about").

    So my point is that even though there is difference in use between "hear" and "hear about", they can be used interchangeably in which they don't bring any big difference in meaning.

    I'm not a native speaer, so I'm not sure of my opinion. If I'm wrong, could please correct me? I reall want to know it for sure.

    Thanks in advance.

  4. #4
    engee30's Avatar
    engee30 is offline Key Member
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    Thumbs up Re: Can you tell me the difference between "hear" and "hear about"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Eureka View Post
    Thank your for your answer. You said they mean same thing. Then how about this context?

    ex> I didn’t hear it but I heard about it.

    The reason why I asked about the difference between "hear" and "hear about" is because of the example above.

    Af first, I thought they mean same, but then I was confused after looing at the example. So I hope you check what I'm understood regarding them.

    In my opinion, when you directly hear something from someone's talking, you can use "hear" and when you hear about something from others, which means you were not involved in hearing it directly. Here are my examples:

    When the teacher told class about the test and I was there at the time then I can say "I heard the test coming up next week."

    but if I wasn't there and one of my friedns in class told me about the test, I can say
    "I heard about the test coming up next week."

    Of course, they mean same thing like other examples.
    ex> I heard it from Mike
    ex> I heard about it from Mike.


    However, I think this applies to the occasion which focuses on the result of "I already know it from hearing" regardless of direct hearing("use of hear") or indirect hearing activities(use of "hear about").

    So my point is that even though there is difference in use between "hear" and "hear about", they can be used interchangeably in which they don't bring any big difference in meaning.

    I'm not a native speaer, so I'm not sure of my opinion. If I'm wrong, could please correct me? I reall want to know it for sure.

    Thanks in advance.
    Reading yor reasoning, I am quite inclined to say you're right about it, actually.

    As for I heard it (ie some news) from Mike vs I heard about it (ie some news) from Mike they really mean the same.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Can you tell me the difference between "hear" and "hear about"?

    I heard it from Mike.

    Here, you are emphasizing the source of the information.

    I heard about it from Mike.
    This refers to, and emphasizes both the news/the happening, and the source (Mike).

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