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  1. #1
    Unregistered Guest

    Default Overuse of the word "for"...what is the rule?

    My staff keep using the word "for" incorrectly in sentences in their reports, and while I know this is incorrect and can correct it each time, I don't know the rule to give them as a guideline to help them learn when to use and not use it. For example "When children visit the home, Stuart closes his bedroom door and does not allow for them to touch or play with any of his belongings" or "She also advised for parents to make a police report". Can anyone help me better explain why they have an extraneous word?

  2. #2
    engee30's Avatar
    engee30 is offline Key Member
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    Cool Re: Overuse of the word "for"...what is the rule?

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    My staff keep using the word "for" incorrectly in sentences in their reports, and while I know this is incorrect and can correct it each time, I don't know the rule to give them as a guideline to help them learn when to use and not use it. For example "When children visit the home, Stuart closes his bedroom door and does not allow for them to touch or play with any of his belongings" or "She also advised for parents to make a police report". Can anyone help me better explain why they have an extraneous word?
    This is Old-English style. Tell them to use Modern-English style.

  3. #3
    Charlie Bernstein is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Overuse of the word "for"...what is the rule?

    Ouch. An interesting problem, and I might have an answer.

    A few years ago, my workplace was overrun with the word that:

    "Tell him that he needs to be here at 4:00."
    "We were hoping that we could host a second event."

    We needed a rule that didn't rely on text-book grammar. Here's what we came up with:

    If the sentence makes sense without it, take it out. If it doesn't, leave it in.

    I think you could try the same rule.

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