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Thread: gerunds

  1. #21
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    Default Re: gerunds

    Quote Originally Posted by notmyname216
    I thought it was determined that "running" was a participle functioning as a adverb in that sentence, not a gerund.
    Actually, it was determined that 'running' shares similarities with participles. Both gerunds and participles can

    (a) be a part of a verb, and
    (b) have an adverbial function, or answer the question How, When, Where?

    It was determined that 'running' looks like a participle because it's part of a verb and it answers the question How?, but it can't be a participle, right?, because it doesn't occur with BE (is, am, was, are, ect.).

  2. #22
    notmyname216 is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: gerunds

    So given the sentences below:

    1) She is running to the store.
    2) She went running to the store.
    3) She is waiting at the store.
    4) She started waiting at the store.

    "running" in sentence 1) is participle functioning as a adverb.
    "running" in sentence 2) is a gerund functioning as a noun.
    "waiting" in sentence 3) is a participle functioning as a verb.
    "waiting" in sentence 4) is a gerund functioning as a noun.

    This seems strange that "running" has 2 different functions yet both sentences have the same meaning.

  3. #23
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    Default Re: gerunds

    Quote Originally Posted by notmyname216
    So given the sentences below:

    1) She is running to the store.
    2) She went running to the store.
    3) She is waiting at the store.
    4) She started waiting at the store.

    "running" in sentence 1) is participle functioning as a adverb.
    "running" in sentence 2) is a gerund functioning as a noun.
    "waiting" in sentence 3) is a participle functioning as a verb.
    "waiting" in sentence 4) is a gerund functioning as a noun.
    In 1) 'running' is part of BE, so it's a present participle. Together, BE + ING is called a progressive, or continuous verb.

    In 2) 'running' is part of a non-BE verb, the verb GO, so it's a gerund. It doesn't function as a noun--that's just its name--it functions as the object of the verb GO.

    In 3) 'waiting' is part of BE, so it's a present participle. Together, BE + ING is called a progressive, or continuous verb.

    In 4) 'waiting' is part of a non-BE verb, the verb GO, so it's a gerund.

    In short:

    BE + ING = present participle
    Non-BE verb + ING = gerund

    Quote Originally Posted by nmn216
    This seems strange that "running" has 2 different functions yet both sentences have the same meaning.
    Well, let me change the verb tenses so that they agree:

    1) She is running to the store.
    2) She goes running to the store every morning.

    There's a difference between BE (exist) and GO (movement towards a destination. In 1) 'is running' expresses what she is doing now, whereas in 2) 'goes running' expresses what she does as a routine.

  4. #24
    notmyname216 is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: gerunds

    So for the sentences below "be" type verbs are not a consistant way to identify if the "-ing" word is a gerund or a participle.

    1) Her favorite fantasy is playing basketball.

    Normally it would be expected that the "is" word would mean "playing" would be a participle but not in this case it is a gerund.

    So I would expect these sentences to be the same:

    2) Her fantasy is playing basketball.
    3) Her fantasy is playing the game of basketball.
    4) The boy is learning golf.

  5. #25
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    Default Re: gerunds

    Quote Originally Posted by notmyname216
    So for the sentences below "be" type verbs are not a consistant way to identify if the "-ing" word is a gerund or a participle.

    2) Her fantasy is playing basketball.
    3) Her fantasy is playing the game of basketball.
    4) The boy is learning golf.
    Right , but 4) contains a progessive verb, "is learning". There's a way to tell if the ING word is part of BE. Look for someone or something doing the action, by asking, What/Who is ____ing?, like this,

    Verb
    The computer is playing basketball.
    Test: What/Who is playing basketball? => The computer is doing it.

    Gerund
    Her fantasy is playing basketball.
    Test: What/Who is playing basketball? => No one is doing it.

  6. #26
    notmyname216 is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: gerunds

    Ok, so for the sentence below "playing" is a verb.

    1) The boy is playing basketball.

    But what about the one below:

    2) My mind is playing games.
    Test: What/Who is playing games? => My mind is doing it?

  7. #27
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    Default Re: gerunds

    Quote Originally Posted by notmyname216
    Ok, so for the sentence below "playing" is a verb.

    1) The boy is playing basketball.

    But what about the one below:

    2) My mind is playing games.
    Test: What/Who is playing games? => My mind is doing it?
    That's correct. My mind is doing something to me.

    If 'playing games' were a noun, a gerund, then it would rename 'My mind', like this,

    ?My mind = playing games (incorrect)
    ?Another name for 'My mind' is the noun 'playing games'. (incorrect)

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