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Thread: proverb

  1. #11
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    Default Re: proverb

    1) A good name is easier lost than won. (I omitted the 'to')

    It's easier to gain a bad reputation than it is to gain a good reputation. That is, do something once that society disapproves of and you get a bad reputation; Do something once that society approves of and your reputation stays the same.

    2) Blood is thicker than water.

    Family members are related by blood. If they share the same DNA, the tendency to care for one another is stronger than it would be for someone who is not related to them by blood. Water is thin, weak, whereas blood ties are thick, strong.

    3) Tomorrow never comes. / Tomorrow never dies. (??)

    Note, there's no need for double question marks (??). One is sufficient.

    Tomorrow is a noun that represents a day that happened before today. When you go to bed at night, you may think about the things you have to do tomorrow, even, maybe wish about what tomorrow will bring, and yet when you wake up the next day, it's today, and never tomorrow. Tomorrow never really comes. It's something we say, think about, and maybe even wish for, yet it's something that will never be realized.

    Tomorrow never dies means that a wish, although it may never realize itself, still exists in one's thinking.

    4) Procrastination is the thief of time. =
    What may be done at any time is done at no time. (?)

    Well, if we think instead of do, we waste our chances of getting done whatever it is we have to do. In other words, over thinking is a waste of time. The added interpretation 'What may be. . . ." doesn't work.

    5) There is no time like the present. (is this a proverb?)

    I doubt if it's a proverb, but I'm not sure. It means, there is no better time than the present time to do something. Do things now, don't procrastinate and leave them for a later date. As they say, "The early bird gets the worm."

    6) One of these days is none of these days.

    People often use the phrase "one of these days" to refer to a future event they know may never come. For example, "One of these days I'm going to clean out my cupboards." So, one of these days (to come) actually never arrives, making it none of these days (to come).

    7) Itís the pot calling the kettle black.

    Both pots and kettles turn black from the smoke and heat of the fire. They share that same characteristic. As for the meaning, let's say, for example, that both my sister and I can't swim, and that we are taking swimming lessons. When I dive in the water and almost drown, she laughs at my stupidity, but then again, why is she laughing? She can't swim either. We both share the same characteristic, we can't swim, and yet she points to my weakness without realizing she, too, has the same weakness. I'd call back, "The pot callin' the kettle, honey!" That is, you, too, are just as weak as I.

    Psst, actually, we both are good swimmings.

    8) Itís dogged that does it.

    I've never heard of 8), sorry. Though, if you find out what it means, please let me know.

    9) Familiarity breeds contempt. = Respect is greater from a distance. (?)

    I don't think "Respect is. . . ." matches, but then again, someone out there might think so. I read 9) as, the more you do something, the more you'll come to dislike it. There's also, the more two people are alike, the greater the probability they'll dislike each other. The reason being, we're generally attracted to people who are not like us; the traits we find ourselves disliking in others are usually traits that we dislike in ourselves.

    10) Gain at the expense of reputation should be called loss.

    If you gain something at the expense of losing your integrity, then you've lost rather than won. In Business, it's called selling your soul.

  2. #12
    hela is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: proverb

    Dear Casiopea,

    - Thank you very much for your explanations. If ever I get any information about 8) and 9b) I'll let you know.

    - Are 4a) and 4b) different? Your explanation works for 4a) only?

    - Sorry I didn't understand you point about "Itís the pot calling the kettle, honey." Is it the same as "Itís the pot calling the kettle,black. " ?

    - Does your explanation of 9) works only for 9a) ?

    Kind regards,
    Hela




  3. #13
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    Default Re: proverb

    Sorry I didn't understand you point about "Itís the pot calling the kettle, honey." Is it the same as "Itís the pot calling the kettle,black. " ?
    It's the same remark I made in another post: it is often better to use the beginning of a proverb instead of the whole thing, as the listener most likely knows it, and the image being soooo trite, it is best not to dwelve on it.
    The proverb is "It's the pot calling the kettle black" (no comma).

    FRC

  4. #14
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    Default Re: proverb

    Quote Originally Posted by hela
    Are 4a) and 4b) different? Your explanation works for 4a) only?
    To me, 4a) is similar to 6):

    4a) Procrastination is the thief of time.
    4b) What may be done at any time is done at no time.


    6) One of these days is none of these days.

    About, "Itís the pot calling the kettle, honey" FRC has it! I omitted the word "black", the object complement, because the sentence was just too long to utter, and by giving just the subject-verb-object structure only, it's possible for the listener to grasp the rest of the saying. In retrospect, I should have added punctuation to let you know that I had omited a word:

    It's just the pot calling the kettle. . ., honey.


    In addition, 'honey' is a term of endearment, and it's used in place of a person's name. It means that sweet substance we get form honey bees. I used it in place of my sister's name. I could have written,

    It's the pot calling the kettle. . . , Mary.
    OR
    Mary, it's the pot calling the kettle. . . .

    As for 9 a) and b), I share the same expression as that expressed by the symbol (?). I don't think the two are related. I've never heard of "Respect is greater from a distance", so I don't know what it means, sorry.

    9a) Familiarity breeds contempt.
    9b) Respect is greater from a distance. (?)

    Sorry for the confusion, and thank FRC.

  5. #15
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    Default Re: proverb



    FRC

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