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Thread: having

  1. Dany's Avatar

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    #1

    having

    Hello everyone,

    My teacher said, that "have" in refer to a possession never works with "ing".

    But now, I found this sentence:

    Concorde, the world's fastest passanger plane, was developed by France and Britain together. In the 1950's, both countries dreamed of having a supersonic plane.

    In this sentence "having" refers to a possession . Or did I misunderstand it?

    Would you please explain me, why there is used "having"?

    Thanks in advance,
    Dany

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    #2

    Re: having

    You're right that it is for possession here, but it is a gerund, used after a preposition. What you're teacher meant was that it isn't used as a main verb for possession:

    I am having (main verb) a supersonic plane. (wrong)
    Having (gerund) a supersonic plane was a dream for them. (fine)


  2. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
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    #3

    Re: having

    Quote Originally Posted by Dany
    Hello everyone,

    My teacher said, that "have" in refer to a possession never works with "ing".

    But now, I found this sentence:

    Concorde, the world's fastest passanger plane, was developed by France and Britain together. In the 1950's, both countries dreamed of having a supersonic plane.

    In this sentence "having" refers to a possession . Or did I misunderstand it?

    Would you please explain me, why there is used "having"?

    Thanks in advance,
    Dany
    As a verb, or when it refers to an action, 'have' doesn't take -ing, but as a noun, or when it refers to a thing, 'have' takes -ing.

    EX: . . . dreamed (verb) of (preposition) having (object/noun/gerund)

    Words that end in -ing that function as objects of the verb or as objects of a preposition are called gerunds. Gerunds are nouns; they refer to a thing, and they look like verbs because they end in -ing.

  3. Dany's Avatar

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    #4

    Re: having

    Thank you very much for your explanations

    Christmas greetings,
    Dany

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
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    #5

    Re: having

    And to you too.

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