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  1. #1
    Maj Guest

    Default a learner difficulties

    Hello....how do I explain to my son the structure of the following group of words: interested in - keen on - fond of - mad about.

    Thanks to who helps.

  2. #2
    abdmlkbd is offline Member
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    Default Re: a learner difficulties

    These are adjective + preposition form. Many adjectives are used in this form. One must know which prep follows which adj.

    Someone is 'interested in something' like,
    Mr. X is interested in reading books.
    Interested is adjective. It means 'showing interest' and the preposition in will follow. Who is showing interest? Mr. X. So the adjective interested is describing whom? the noun - Mr. X.

    fond is another adj; it takes the prep 'of'.
    'fond of' means - strong liking

    mad about is another adj, it takes the prep 'about'
    i am mad about my son
    be mad about sb/sth to love someone or something.

    There are many more such adjective+prep - one just has to know the meaning of the adj and be sure which prep to follow and use.
    like: good at, careful of, passion for etc.

    But, sorry I don't know the use of keen on! If keen means 'strong' then what I know is we use it before noun, like: keen interest, keen sense and so on!

  3. #3
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    Default Re: a learner difficulties

    Adjectival phrases

    Adjectival phrases either

    1.expand noun phrases or
    2. complete the verb (act as the complement)
    For example:

    They are really enthusiastic.

    The adjective enthusiastic is modified by the adverb really to form the adjectival phrase. It is the complement of the verb are.

    They are keen on football.

    The adjective keen combines with the prepositional phrase, on football. The head of the phrase is keen, and the phrase describes the keen-ness, so itís an adjectival phrase.

    the unusually tall boy

    The adjective tall is modified by the adverb unusually to form the adjectival phrase. It expands the noun phrase the boy.

    At KS3 one main area of development with adjective phrases is likely to concern the use of prepositions and linking words (e.g. different from, conscious of, accustomed to, sufficiently big to).

  4. #4
    abdmlkbd is offline Member
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    Default Re: a learner difficulties

    thanks David! thanks a lot!

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